The Plates

Ai: FirstNationalFlag

This variation of the First National Flag was captured from an unknown unit at Gettysburg. It is fairly typical of the First National Flag save that the stars are somewhat larger than usual. The infantry colour sergeant wears a first pattern Richmond Depot jacket, with the three stripes and a star officially designated for an ordnance sergeant but widely worn by colour sergeants.

A2: Co. F, 1st Kentucky InFantry Regiment

Companies were often presented with a colour on

3rd Regiment Battle Flag Arkansas

The jrd Louisiana Infantry received this battle flag after being reorganized after its surrender at Vicksburg in the summer of 1863. It served thereafter in the Trans-Mississippi Department under this flag. The battle honours and unit designation are applied with white cotton letters sewn onto the flag.

The jrd Louisiana Infantry received this battle flag after being reorganized after its surrender at Vicksburg in the summer of 1863. It served thereafter in the Trans-Mississippi Department under this flag. The battle honours and unit designation are applied with white cotton letters sewn onto the flag.

leaving for war. The unit designation was often placed on the white stripe in the field. This example of the First National Flag has an unusually sized canton, although six-pointed stars were not uncommon. The 1 st Kentucky was formed in mid-1861 and served for one year in northern Virginia before disbandment.

A3: Co. D, 21 st Mississippi InFantry Regiment This First National Flag variation was made by the Woodville, Mississippi, Ladies' Auxiliary for the local Jefferson Davis Guards, which became Co. D, 21st Mississippi Infantry Regiment. The regiment served in the Army of Northern Virginia from the Seven Days' to Appomattox. The flag is made of wool with cotton stars; it is 49 inches on the hoist and 76 inches on the fly.

Bi: gth Arkansas InFantry Regiment The canton of this Second National Flag is larger than regulation, and lacks the standard white fim-bration. The 9th Arkansas surrendered at Port Hudson on 9 July 1863 and was paroled. After being exchanged it finished the war in the Army of

Battle Flags Port Hudson

This red cotton Hag was captured in Texas and is typical of a number of similar battle flags from that area. The St. Andrew's cross is dark blue and the cotton stars are white. Small holes along the hoist edge show where it was once nailed to a staff.

This red cotton Hag was captured in Texas and is typical of a number of similar battle flags from that area. The St. Andrew's cross is dark blue and the cotton stars are white. Small holes along the hoist edge show where it was once nailed to a staff.

Tennessee, surrendering on 26 April 1865 in North Carolina.

B2: WauVs Texas Legion

This virtually regulation Second National Flag was made for Col. Bernard Timmons, who commanded the 12 infantry companies of Waul's Texas Legion. The colour was made when the unit was reformed after it was captured at Vicksburg in 1863. The unit served in the Trans-Mississippi Department until disbanded in May 1865.

Bj: Third National Flag

This particular Third National Flag probably flew over some government installation. It lacks the regulation white fimbration, but is otherwise made according to the flag law of 4 March 1865.

B4: Upson County Guards

This Third National Flag was made in England in 1864 as a Second National Flag and had the red stripe at its end added later. It was captured from the Upson County, Georgia, Guards on 20 April 1865. Made of bunting and cotton, 42^ inches at the hoist and 88| in the fly, it has a silk cross and stars.

Ci: 8th Virginia Infantry Regiment

This first issue Army of Northern Virginia battle flag was supposedly made by the wife of Gen. Pierre G. T. Beauregard with silk from her own dresses, and presented to the 8th by the general in recognition of valour in the Battle of Balls Bluff. The 8th served in the Army of Northern Virginia until after Gettysburg, when it was transferred to the Department of Richmond which Beauregard commanded in 1864.

C2:4th North Carolina Infantry Regiment This first bunting issue Army of Northern Virginia battle flag bears battle honours printed on white cotton strips and sewn onto the colour. Identical honours were sewn on the battle flags of the 6th South Carolina and 2nd Florida Infantry Regiments (in the latter case they were sewn in the middle of the colour), among other regiments with the same style of battle honours. The regiments served in different divisions of Longstreet's Corps at the Seven Pines but were thereafter separated, so it is assumed that these honours were placed on the flags of units in that Corps shortly after the battle.

Cj: 5th Florida Infantry Regiment This first bunting pattern Army of Northern Virginia battle flag measures 47 inches square and was issued in early summer 1862. The 5th served in the Army of Northern Virginia from Second Manassas until it surrendered with only six officers and 47 enlisted men at Appomattox.

C4:49th Georgia Infantry Regiment Many of the third bunting pattern Army of Northern Virginia battle flags of regiments of the Army of Northern Virginia were made with the yellow painted unit designation as shown (see Table B). As seen by its battle honours, the regiment was an active one, until it surrendered with only eight officers and 103 enlisted men at Appomattox.

Di: yth Virginia Infantry Regiment The unit designation style on this third bunting pattern Army of Northern Virginia battle flag appears to have been common in Pickett's Division. While the 7th served in Kemper's and later W. R. Terry's brigades in that division, two other regiments with similar colours—the 18th and 28th Virginia Infantry Regiments—served in Garnett's and later Hunton's brigades in the same division. The flag of the 18th has '18th Va.' embroidered in white on the hoist side of the field and 'Regt. Inf'y.' on the fly side of the hoist, as do those of the 7th and 28th Regiments.

D2:28th North Carolina Infantry Regiment This style of battle honours appears to have been unique to Lane's Brigade of A. P. Hill's Division of the Army of Northern Virginia, which included the 7th, 18th, 28th, 33rd, and 37th North Carolina Regiments. The surviving colour of the 37th North Carolina is identical to this one save that the honour at the top of the colour reads NEW BERNE, while that on the hoist is MALVERN HILL and that on the fly is MANNASSAS (sic).

Dj: qth Virginia In fantrv Regiment This rather crude unit designation on a third bunting pattern Army of Northern Virginia battle flag appears to have been executed within the unit. The 9th lost over half its officers and men at Gettysburg, surrendering with just two officers and 37 enlisted men at Appomattox.

D4: Co. C, 10th North Carolina Regiment Volunteers—1st Artillery

The 10th had five heavy and five light artillery-companies, of which Co. C.—also known as the 'Charlotte Artillery'—was a light battery which served in the Army of Northern Virginia from July 1862. The type of unit designation shown here usually appears on third bunting pattern Army of Northern Virginia battle flags, as mentioned above.

Ei: 4th Missouri Infantry Regiment This is the Van Dorn pattern colour of the 4th Missouri, which was organized in April 1862 and was captured at Vicksburg in July 1863.

E2:15th Arkansas Infantry Regiment The 'NW' on this Van Dorn pattern colour represents the lath's nickname, the 'Northwest Regiment'. The colour, 46 inches by 65 inches, was apparently presented to the unit in October or November 1862. One of three Arkansas units so numbered, this 15th was surrendered at Vicksburg and not reorganized thereafter.

0 0

Responses

  • simret
    Which flags were surrendered at appomattox flags?
    6 years ago

Post a comment