Mississippi

Ten Mississippi prisoners of war were said to have arrived in Washington, DC, by the Daily National Intelligencer of 25 July 1861: 'One of them is Lieut.Col. B. B. Boone, a splendid officer in appearance, though clad in rough gray cloth, trimmed in faded cotton velvet facings'.

Col. Boone's uniform appears to have been that prescribed by the state's military board in January 1861: 'All officers shall wear a frock coat of gray cloth, the skirl to extend from two-thirds to three-fourths of the distance from the top of the hip to (he bend of the knee'. Generals and field officers had two rows of buttons, seven in each row, the rows being five and a half inches apart at the top and three and a half at the bottom. Company-grade officers had one row of nine buttons. Field officers were to have black standing collars trimmed in half-inch-wide gold lace. Three small buttons were to be worn at each cuff, one at each hip, and one at each skirt end. Company officers were to have coloured collars trimmed in half-inch-wide gold lace, coloured culls, and 'silk braid of the facings of the corps, running each side from the buttons, the top braid extending five inches and the bottom one two inches, and the intermediate braids graduating from one to the other'.

Enlisted men were to wear coats like those of company grade officers, but with branch-of-service colour worsted braid on the chest. Branch-of-scrvice colours were unusual: crimson for infantry and

Mississippi Infantry

Typically, New Hampshire infantrymen wore forage caps decorated with their branch of service insignia, company letter, regimental number, and 'NHV for New Hampshire Volunteers. The regulation frock coat was most commonly worn, as by this member of Company E, 15th New Hampshire Infantry Regiment. The 15th was raised in early 1862 for nine months of active duty with the Army of the Potomac, seeing action at Chancellorsville. (David Schcinmann collection)

Typically, New Hampshire infantrymen wore forage caps decorated with their branch of service insignia, company letter, regimental number, and 'NHV for New Hampshire Volunteers. The regulation frock coat was most commonly worn, as by this member of Company E, 15th New Hampshire Infantry Regiment. The 15th was raised in early 1862 for nine months of active duty with the Army of the Potomac, seeing action at Chancellorsville. (David Schcinmann collection)

riflemen, yellow for cavalry, and orange for artillery.

'For fatigue, a red flannel shirt with a star of white on each side of the collar, for Infantry or Riflemen, a grey flannel shirt for Artillery, and blue for Cavalry.'

Trousers were grey, with black cords being worn by generals, an inch-wide black stripe by field grade officers, and an inch-wide branch-of-service colour stripe for everyone else.

Officers' epaulettes were almost the same as the US Army pattern, except that a major-general wore a single gold star; a lieutenant-colonel, a gold leaf; and a major, a silver leaf. Shoulder straps bore the same insignia, on a dark blue ground for all branches of service. Non-commissioned officers wore Confederate Army style chevrons in branch-of-service colours. A half-chevron was allowed to be worn above the cuff to mark previous US military service. Major-generals were also marked by a gold star, three-quarters of an inch in diameter, on each

Mississippi Infantry Regiments

The rather odd-looking 'Whipple' cap, as worn by this soldier, was issued to men from New Hampshire and New York, as well as other north-eastern states: see Plate B3. The man's apparently state-issue jacket has shoulder straps trimmed in sky blue, but has no trim on the standing collar. (David Scheinmann collection)

The rather odd-looking 'Whipple' cap, as worn by this soldier, was issued to men from New Hampshire and New York, as well as other north-eastern states: see Plate B3. The man's apparently state-issue jacket has shoulder straps trimmed in sky blue, but has no trim on the standing collar. (David Scheinmann collection)

collar; brigadier-generals wore it in silver.

Hats were black, broad-brimmed, 'looped up on three sides, when on parade, to be ornamented with cord, tassel and plumes ... the plumes to be made of horse hair'. Major-generals had long, flowing white plumes; brigadier-generals, red plumes tipped with white; medical officers, green plumes; adjutant general's corps officers, yellow plumes; quartermaster general's department, blue plumes; ordnance corps officers, blue plumes tipped with red; and other officers and men, plumes of branch-of-service colour 'with a yellow metal number of their Regiments below the plume socket'. Hat cords were also in branch or corps colours. While these hats appear from photographs to have been common, the plumes seem to have been but rarely worn.

All officers were to wear crimson sashes. Cravats were to be 'black, light, to be worn loose'. Overcoats were 'for all non-commissioned officers and men ... sacks made of waterproof cotton'.

Judging from photographs, this uniform was not only issued in 1861, but worn for some considerabli time after.

According to the 1861 orders, sword belt plan were to be, for officers, 'a plain clasp of gilt or brass'. and for men, 'a plain brass buckle'. US-type oval brass belt plates and cartridge box plates bearinu the state seal of an eagle within an oval were alsi. worn, some 2,000 of them having been made by .1 Massachusetts manufacturer before the war. A casi brass rectangular plate with the same design u.i-also used.

Buttons were not described in orders, bin surviving examples have a five-pointed star, with the legend 'MISSISSIPPI' around the edge. Mosi have a block letter T, 'A', or 'C' in the star's centre, depending on the wearer's branch of service.

Mississippi had its own state armoury which mostly converted civilian weapons to 0.58-cal. military longarms. It did produce some Maynard pattern carbines, and possibly even some rifles. The 1st Mississippi Infantry Regiment was armed with these state-made weapons. The state also conveneĀ« I and issued 1,000 Hall flintlock rifles to its troop-.

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Responses

  • Arcangelo
    Who wore enlisted frock coats in the civil war?
    6 years ago

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