Infantry division organisation

Rifle Division

Field Veterinary Engineer Artillery. Ambulance Service Battalion Brigade

Light Artillery Battalion (3)

Mortar-Howitzer Battalion

Heavy Artillery Battalion

Rifle Brigades (3)

Armour Hospital Detachment

Signals Aviation Battalion Detachments

Cavalry Regiment

Rifle Regiments (3) _SaPPer Supply Artillery

" x ' Company Company Battalion

Rifle Regiments (3) _SaPPer Supply Artillery

" x ' Company Company Battalion

Rifle Battalions (3)

MG

Mortar

Signals

Mounted

1 1 Sapper Chemical

Commandant's

Team 1

Team

Team

Scouts Team

Team Team

Team

Rifle MG Platoon Platoons (3)

Companies (3)

Logistics First Aid Veterinary Team Detachment Station

Regimental School

Rifle MG Platoon Platoons (3)

Companies (3)

Logistics First Aid Veterinary Team Detachment Station

Regimental School divisions were far too cumbersome, and changes were introduced up to mid-1919. As a result, the cavalry divizions (half-regiments) that were part of rifle divisions were amalgamated to become a cavalry regiment, the number of batteries was reduced to five, and divisions were officially allowed to have 35 per cent fewer commanders and men than the official establishment. But even these reductions did not reflect the true state of affairs: rifle divisions rarely numbered more than 10-15,000 men (and sometimes as few as 3-4,000), 50-150 machine-guns and 18-46 artillery pieces. It was therefore common for a division to have only two rifle brigades instead of three.

Rifle brigade (Brigada) The Prikaz of 13 November 1918 envisaged a brigade of three rifle regiments, one artillery battalion and one sapper company (of 361 men), plus supply and administrative units. Altogether each brigade was to have 11,000 men, 1,700 horses, 144 machine-guns, 18 mortars, eight howitzers and 14 field guns. However, in practice field strength was usually between 1,500 and 4,000 men.

Rifle brigades were progressively reduced in size until finally they were formally abolished in 1922.

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