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Stand of five hundred pikes well armed with sponsibility of raising troops for the Crown were headpiece and corslet will be a very terrible thing to obliged to issue them with 'Coat and Conduct' be seen in these countries'. By this time most West money, i.e. uniform coats, and sufficient funds to European infantry had abandoned armour as too pay for their journey, or conducting, to the much of a restriction for swift marches, the only rendezvous of the Royal army. Different counties significant...

I

Ivory, and the gold-trimmed sleeveless buff-coat. Two views of the 'Saluting Posture' of a musketeer r one from a manual of 1623 and the other a statuette from Cromwell House, Highgate. Again, the posture is copied from de Gheyn's original design. The statuette dates from c.1638, but gives a good impression of a musketeer of the Civil War. (By courtesy of the Boards of Trustees of the British Library and the Royal Armouries) In the early years of the war men volunteered for service under King...

N me it ft fi and onev

These sketches are from engravings c.1635 on the brass clasps of the Great Vellum Book of the Honourable Artillery Company. The upper two are commision officers, the lower pair, a sergeant and an ensign. Above Trained Band officers. These sketches are from engravings c.1635 on the brass clasps of the Great Vellum Book of the Honourable Artillery Company. The upper two are commision officers, the lower pair, a sergeant and an ensign. sort' who might turn their...

X

The new military styles introduced by the Dutch leader Maurice of Nassau, Prince of Orange were inspired by his extensive reading of Classical Roman and Greek texts. The illustrations here show the Roman Triplex Acies from a 17th century translation of Caesar's Gallic Wars (left) and a contemporary view of the Battle of Nieuport (right). This shows the Dutch 'Princes Battel' drawn up in the new style, and the Spanish Army in more massive but less manouevrable Tercios. (Author's collection, as...

17th Century Drums

The true manner how her doe exerciie her company of Souldicrs in her own Countrey in a a wariike manners with fome other new-f und ipcrimencs, and pretty extravagrmts fitting for ill Chriftian podics to caknow. tinted in the yeare. Wh en her did her enemy jeere , 164 3. one occasion they simply refused to let him read the meant anything more precise than headgear, and papers, and when he seized their stolen property there is some doubt whether those mentioned in they returned in greater numbers...

Info

The colonel, lieutenant-colonel and sergeant-major appear on the roll twice, as staff officers and as captains of companies. They also drew pay and allowances in both roles. The colonel, lieutenant-colonel and sergeant-major appear on the roll twice, as staff officers and as captains of companies. They also drew pay and allowances in both roles. manded by Coronells. Regiments conteine not alwaies a like number of Companies, some having 10, some 11, 12, 13, 14, 15 and some thirty Companies and...

Frmupiet aairitnts areft then Cay m s Cnecke to tfie fie cite

Third for the pikemen, which for the most part they keep'. Most English writers in the 1620s and 1630s still held that a company should have equal proportions of pikemen and musketeers, and Trained Band units were still equipped in this way on the eve of the first Bishops' War in 1639 but opinion was beginning to favour an increased ratio of musketeers. A proportion of pikemen were still necessary, of course, as only the protection they offered could prevent under most circumstances an infantry...

Xpg

Or battle cry was usually something simple such as 'God and the Cause1 or 'For God and Parliament'. This reduced the confusion somewhat but on occasion both sides adopted identical field signs and on at least one occasion the same battle cry. Several officers were captured through wrongly assuming the soldiers they rode up to were on the same side. When first raised regiments were uniformed in a wide variety of colours including red, blue, green, yellow, white or grey, black and even purple. A...

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A diagram from William Barriffe's manual Military Discipline or the Young Artilleryman. This shows a Company of Foot practising continuous fire once the front line has fired it retires to the rear to reload, allowing the next rank to fire in its turn. iV , y. . V v Vy . . gt MiawBigg 33 amp KH5 ffl MPCB6 awft 8 iHdnUHlKa

Battle Of Marston Moor

Battle New Model Army, Naseby, 1645 1,2 Pikeman 8c musketeer, Sir Thomas Fairfax's Regiment 3 Ensign, Prince Rupert's Regiment ___ Aftermath Marston Moor, 1644 1 Pikeman, Marquis of Newcastle's Regiment 2 Musketeer, Earl of Manchester's Regiment 3 Surgeon Aftermath Marston Moor, 1644 1 Pikeman, Marquis of Newcastle's Regiment 2 Musketeer, Earl of Manchester's Regiment 3 Surgeon

Books

The English were introduced to the new Dutch style through their involvement as mercenaries or allies of the Dutch in their war of independence against Spain. One of the earliest works in this style to be printed in English was John Bingham's The Tactiks of Aelian in 1616. Bingham's comment in his introduction expressed the English view of the time The practice of Aelian's precepts have long lien wrapped up in darkness, and buried as it were in the ruins of time, until it was revived, and...

Roman Legion Formations

Published in 1989 by Osprey Publishing Ltd 59 Grosvenor Street, London W1X 9DA Copyright 1989 Osprey Publishing Ltd Reprinted 1991, 1992 All rights reserved. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study, research, criticism or review, as permitted under the Copyright Designs and Patents Act, 1988, no part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, electrical, chemical, mechanical, optical,...

Thomas Rainsborough

Army Mutiny 1647

By the appointment of his ExeeUency Sir Th o-mas Fairfax and the generall conn eel I of the Army. J 0. london Printed for John Partridge, in Black-fryers at the london Printed for John Partridge, in Black-fryers at the regiments, and an adequate pay-chest. T his was the , H2 Pikeman and Musketeer, Sir Thomas Fairfax's Sir Thomas Fairfax, commander of the cavalry of his father Ferdinando, Lord Fairfax's Northern Army, and later commander of the New Model Army. An intensely fair-minded man, he...

Clement Edmonds Caesar

Frontispiece of Clement Edmonds' Observations Upon Caesar's Commentaries. This included as an appendix one of the earliest versions of the new Dutch style of drill published in English. The image above the title is Henry, Prince of Wales, the ill-fated elder brother of Charles I. came to drawing men together for training, particularly in areas where a man from the next county was a stranger to be viewed with suspicion, but it also meant that few commanders had any military experience. The Crown...

De Gheyn Exercise Of Arms

Number of different tactical styles, but as William BarrifFe comments, a captain should 'make use of so many of them, as he shall think fit for his present occasion or exercise1. It is this choice of the essential forms of drill which the Earl of Essex referred to in the opening months of the Civil War when he instructed his officers not to attempt too much with the newly raised soldiers, but 'to bring them to use their arms readily and expertly, and not to busy them in practising the...

Captain Sanford S Firelocks

D2 Musketeer, King's Oxford Army, 643 This soldier wears a 'Powder-Bag' containing paper cartridges with a flask containing priming powder suspended beneath it. These were issued as a temporary expedient to overcome a shortage of bandoleers. A11 order for the delivery of stores for the manufacture of these powder-bags shows that they were made of 'Calfe skinns tanned and oyled'. His uniform coat, breeches and montero cap are part of the issue of 1643 provided by the entrepreneur Thomas Bushell...

Firelock Regiments

Training Royalist musketeers 1 Musketeer, Royal Army, 1642 2 Musketeer, Kings Oxford Army, 1643 3 'Firelock', Capt. Sanford's Firelocks, 1643 Training Royalist musketeers 1 Musketeer, Royal Army, 1642 2 Musketeer, Kings Oxford Army, 1643 3 'Firelock', Capt. Sanford's Firelocks, 1643 Tavern Col. Samuel Jones's Regiment, 1643 1 Fifer Skirmish The Westminster Trained Bands, Basing House, 1643 1 Officer 2 Ensign