Georgia Infantry Regiment Mine Creek

I*

Thegth South Carolina Cavalry's battle Hag has the evenly spaced stars associated with the Department of South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida, although it was captured at 'Frevilian Station. (South Carolina Confederate Relic Room and Museum)

addition of 'blue or gold stars', as having been in Polk's command, A surviving example, without stars, was carried by the 30th Arkansas Infantry until it was captured on 31 December 1862. It measures 40 inches on the hoist by 4ft inches, with white letters outlined in black on the top border '30th REG' and 'ARK INF' on the bottom border. The flag also had white outlined hattle honours for 'FARMÍNGTON/ MISS' on the top field and 'RICHMOND/KY* on the bottom field.

The colour adopted in Polk's Corps possibly draws its inspiration from Polk's pre-war service as an Episcopal bishop. Adopted in March 1862, it featured the cross of St. George, the emblem of the Episcopal Church, on a dark blue field. Typically, with these battle flags the cross of St. George was red, edged in white, with ti five-pointed white stars. However, battle flags from Alabama regiments, including the 22nd and 24th Alabama Infantry from Withers' Division, lacked the red cross and stars. These battle flags, too, came in a w ide variety of sizes, that of e.g. the 1st Tennessee Infantry being only 28 inches on the hoist, while that of the 22nd Alabama is 41^ inches on the hoist.

On 23 November 1862 Maj. Gen, Benjamin F. Cheatham authorized the placing of a pair of crossed cannon on the battle flag of any regiment in his division of Polk's Corps that had overrun and captured Union artillery in action. A month later this order was made army-wide. These cannon appear in both dark blue on a w hite field and white on a dark blue or red field; the muzzles usually point down — indeed, they arc often noted as being 'inverted' —but they sometimes point up,

Eiragg's Corps was added to the Army ofTennes-scc in February 1862. At that time regiments in the corps, which had no uniform type of battle flag, were issued battle flags very similar to the first Army of Northern Virginia pattern. Since Beauregard designed the Hags the similarity between these and the Army of Northern Virginia battle flags comes as no surprise. The Bragg's Corps models were, however, made of bunting instead of silk, with a broad pink border and 12 six-pointed, rather than five-pointed, stars. One of these battle flags, carried by the 7th Mississippi Infantry, measures 48} inches on the hoist and 42+ on the fly.

Several months after the first shipment of Bragg's Corps battle flags appeared a second issue was made. These flags differed from the first issue in being rectangular instead of virtually square. An original carried by the 57th Georgia Infantry measures 424

7th Kentucky Infantry Regiment

1; First National Flag

2: Co. E, 1st Kentucky Infantry Regiment

3: Co. D, 21si Mississippi Infantry Regiment

1; First National Flag

2: Co. E, 1st Kentucky Infantry Regiment

3: Co. D, 21si Mississippi Infantry Regiment

0 0

Post a comment