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(Left) Roundway Down, SK a dismounted dragoon of Wardlaw's Regiment with a political pamphlet tucked in his hat - a Civil War practice among Roundhead activists. Some Civil War dragoon regiments had to serve on foot for months before even receiving horses. At the Powick Bridge muster, which was organised by the Commandery at Worcester, there was a display of dragoon tactics by a combined unit 92 strong riding up to their objective, they dismounted to fight on foot while SK cavalry troopers led...

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(Above) A dragoon passes the news of the day with a gun crew of the Parliament's army. Second Newbury, SK. (Left) A quiet scene in an idyllic spot - until you start wondering about that rope A hanging party prepare to give a spy his quietus. Roundway Down, SK. (Left) A captain of foot of the Rarl of Stamford's Regiment enjoys a last peaceful pipe as the camp stirs around him. Roundway Down, SK. (Left) A captain of foot of the Rarl of Stamford's Regiment enjoys a last peaceful pipe as the camp...

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(Top left & right) The last shots fired, musketeers reverse their weapons and rush forward to fight hand-to-hand with the butts. This was a recognised tactic, not an act of individual desperation (the 17th century command was Fall on pell-mell ) the heavy musket with its angular butt was a murderous skull-crusher. Edgehill, SK. (Left) A last desperate pike charge as the climax of battle approaches. Second Newbury, SK. W mitWTi .r v. > i (Left) A trooper of Prince Rupert's Lifeguard comes...

Guns

Civil War artillery came in as motley an array of sizes and designs as all other equipment. Cannon ranged from the little robinet weighing 1201bs., firing a 3Alb. ball of I'Ain. calibre, to the 4 ton, 8in. calibre cannon royal firing a 631b. ball with a 401b. powder charge. Artillery was of central importance in the many sieges around which the regional campaigns of the field armies often revolved. Trains of artillery were dragged laboriously around the country by large horse teams over bad...

B2

Left and below Under the orders of a sergeant at the far end of the ranks, the Tower Hamlets men to judge from their colours in the background, from the second captain's company - see page 32 make ready to fire. As with the pike, technical treatises included dozens of drill postures each with its own word of command, giving an impression of complexity. In wartime practice the handling of the weapon would be learned as a logical sequence and the number of separate commands would be reduced to...

Isbn 1872004547

The authors and publisher wish to record their gratitude for the generous assistance of many people during the preparation of this book, including particularly the following Nick Bacon, Mark Beaby, Peter Bentham Hill, Gareth Blyth, John Crawford, Barry Denton, Howard Giles, Mark Harrison, Chris Johnson, Stuart Reid, Keith Roberts, David Ryan, Margaret Smith, Kelvin Spooner, Des Thomas, John Tincey, Dennis Ward, Tig Wright at Basing House Ian Barret, Simon Frame, Phil French, Gerry Hughes, Geoff...

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Left The colours of the Tower Hamlets Trained Bands regiment of Parliamentary foot were clearly recorded, and one is carried here by Sealed Knot re-enactors at Weston Super Mare. The whole regiment carried red colours with the silver central motto JEHOVA PROVIDEBIT God Will Provide surrounded by palm branches, with small palms in the corners, all except the colonel's having the St.George's Cross in the upper hoist canton. The sergeant-major's bore a single disc at the top edge beside the...

Info

Powick Bridge

Above left Meanwhile, the humbler soldiers have nothing to do but wait, in what calm they can command infantry of the sergeant-major's company, James Carr's Regiment, Western Association, SK, at Roundway Down. Above For many in the ranks of Parliament's armies their nonconformist faith was a shield against doubt and fear this pikeman of Can 's, like some of his Civil War forebears, has scribed biblical quotations on his helmet. Roundway Down, SK. Left Both sides brought passionate religious...

Colours and Drums

17th Century Jeromes Creek Map

Each company of a Civil War infantry regiment had its own flag - the colour or ensign. Surviving evidence shows that while those of the various regiments differed quite widely, there was a common system of design. A typical though far from universal scheme was as follows The senior colonel's company colour might be a plain field in a colour common to all the regiment's ensigns. The lieutenant colonel's was plain apart from a St.George's Cross in the upper hoist corner. The sergeant-major's...

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These photographs show shot of the Tower Hamlets Trained Bands, SK, during a muster at Weston Super Mare. The Trained Bands were local militias first raised in Queen Elizabeth's reign, which by 1642 varied widely in strength, equipment and preparedness but they were the nearest thing England had to a standing army, and both sides tried to get control of them and their armouries by selective appointment of officers. Most Trained Bands refused to serve outside their counties. Notable exceptions...

Powick Bridge How Many Roundheads Died

The Royalist army, SK. forms for battle at Edgehill. In the foreground, troopers of Prince Rupert's Lifeguard of Horse right, the Royal Standard, and beyond it the pikes of Sir Nicholas Slanning's Regiment in the distance, the King's Lifeguard of Foot march on. During the Civil War major battles might involve armies of between 10,000 and 15,000 men on each side. The largest was Marston Moor, in July 1644, fought by a total of around 46,000 men. About 1,500 Parliamentarians and between 3,000 and...

Wheellock Carbine

Battle Powick Bridge Civil War

Left Member of Sir Edward Hungerford's Regiment of Horse, ECWS, at Basing House. He wears the classic lobster pot helmet, which is found differing widely in quality and details of design. Single visor bars are associated with Dutch-made imports probably more likely to be used by Royalist troops , and triple bars with English-made helmets and thus, Parliamentarian supplies . The steel body armour was often claimed to be proof against pistol balls, but seems to have varied widely in degree of...

Images Of Spanish Musketeers

Images Spanish Musketeers

SK blue ensign of a regiment using a motif from its commander's heraldic arms instead of simple geometric shapes. I.eft Weston Super Mare, SK white ensign with pile identifying the sergeant-major's company. Right Pendennis Castle, SK a white-on-black colonel's company colour, carried by the recreated Sir Nicholas Slanning's Regiment. Left Sccond Battle of Newbury, SK ensigns of Prince Rupert's Regiment of Foot had a black and white quartered design with companies...

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Some re-enactors use headless staves, others heads of carved and painted wood or of vulcanised rubber, for cheapness and safety metal heads are expensive and easily damaged . Below Second Battle of Newbury, SK pikemen of Slanning's Regiment and background the Western Association move into the attack Striped pike staves are used by this re-enactment unit for Below Second Battle of Newbury, SK an artillery gun captain - note his linstock, and the whip for gun team horses - warns a...

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Bathroom Blowjobs School

Above At Powick Bridge a combined Sealed Knot and English Civil War Society muster allowed the assembly of 120 mounted cavalry. Here Hungerford's Regiment of the Roundhead Association, ECWS, ride through the English countryside in buff and steel - a splendid sight, and slightly eerie for 1992. Left Powick Bridge the commander of Hungerford's Regiment confers with his trumpeter. At Powick Bridge officers did not wear buff leather, but black coats. Like drummers of foot, Civil War cavalry...

Sir Thomas Ballard Regiment

Diss Cavalry Use The Ballard Carbine

Left Weston Super Mare, SK second captain's colour, Sir Thomas Ballard's Regiment. Civil War colours were about 6ft.6in. square, of painted silk, flown on quite short staves which allowed the bearers to perform elaborate ceremonial flourishes. For economy, today's reproductions are sometimes made of linen or cotton, and cost around 25 - silk reproductions can cost around 100, and colours arc easily damaged in battle. The colour was carried by the junior company officer,the term ensign also...

Cavaliers And Roundheads Pictures

Roundheads And Cavalier Armour

Very few Civil War units wore full cuirassier armour - the last echo of the medieval knight -with a close helmet or a burgonet and full torso, shoulder, arm and thigh armour. Although it gave very good protection it was expensive, difficult to maintain for whole units on campaign, and exhaustingly heavy and hot to fight in for a generation of men who - unlike their ancestors - had not been raised from boyhood to bear it. After the rout, at Roundway Down in July 1643, of Parliamentarian Sir...

Sealed Knot Clive Simpson

Some members of re-enactment societies take their interest in the arts, crafts and daily life of 17th century England beyond the purely military aspects. Some go to great trouble and expense to equip themselves for demanding living history recreations of civil as well as military life. Apart from the displays which they put on for the public and for educational bodies, these enthusiasts meet privately to enjoy each others' company and to share their knowledge. Most of these pictures were taken...

Matchlock Musketeer

Roundheads And Cavaliers

Right Reliance on a burning match could leave units of shot helpless at short notice in rainy weather even very damp air increases the rate of misfires to anything up to 50 per cent . Naked flame and loose powder was a recipe for frequent accidents. Night attacks were often betrayed by the tell-tale points of light. Free from all these drawbacks were the early flintlock firelock muskets, available to Civil War armies in small numbers. Needing no naked flame, they could be carried loaded but...

Period Reenactment

U X lharge your pike The order from the grim- faeed Royalist officer is almost drowned by an echoing volley of Parliamentarian musketry. Drums rattle out their urgent commands, and brightly coloured flags blow in the wind amidst the belching smoke of cannon-fire. A typical scene from the English Civil Wars yet this is not 1642, but a Sunday afternoon three and a half centuries later. The Sealed Knot is once again in action. Named after the Royalist underground organisation which plotted the...