Headgear

Infantrymen were issued with two types of headgear; a full dress hat and a forage cap. The elaborate full dress hat was adopted in 1858 and named ironically after two future Confederates who had sat on the selection board before the war. The hat was most popularly known as a Hardee hat after Major William J. Hardee

Private wearing a regulation overcoat and forage cap but underneath he seems to be dressed in a double breasted fireman's shirt which he's left open at the collar. Such shirts proved to be very popular items of clothing. David Scheinmann.

who later became a Confederate general, and sometimes as a Jeff Davis hat, after future Confederate president Jefferson Davis. The origins of the Hardee hat date back to the Mexican war when Colonel Timothy P. Andrews commanding the regiment of Voltigeurs ordered a brimmed hat for his regiment. The war ended before the hats could be worn and they were put in storage until they were discovered by a dragoon captain who issued them to his men.

The 1858 hats were made out of black felt and the three inch brim was looped against the side of the hat and held by a brass 'eagle' fastened to the brim of the crown. The crown of the hat was six inches high and featured the insignia of the particular regiment who were wearing the hats on the front. The most spectacular feature of the hats were the three ostrich feathers fastened to the side and a cord with acorn or tassel designs on the end that encircled the hat. At first the cords were black and yellow and later of various colours. Infantrymen were originally ordered to wear their Hardee hats looped up on the left, but in

149th Bucktail Soldiers

It was common for soldiers, particularly in the early stages of the war, to take 'extra' weaponry along with them; especially if the armanent supply to their company or regiment wasn't all that it should be. This infantry private has a Bowie knife stuffed into the front of his shirt, but his huge bow tie looks even more formidable. David Scheinmann.

Civil War Shirt Pattern

Photographs showing enlisted men in shirtsleeves are comparatively rare. Note the man's braces and his shirt's baggy sleeves and small collar. This was the most common pattern of shirt found in the Civil War. David Scheinmann.

It was common for soldiers, particularly in the early stages of the war, to take 'extra' weaponry along with them; especially if the armanent supply to their company or regiment wasn't all that it should be. This infantry private has a Bowie knife stuffed into the front of his shirt, but his huge bow tie looks even more formidable. David Scheinmann.

February 1861 infantrymen were ordered to loop their hats up on the right. The hat cords were originally worn with their tassels on the side opposite the feathers but early in the war there was a vogue for wearing them on the front of the hats.

Despite their pedigree, Hardee hats proved to be unpopular with many infantrymen because they were so stiff and heavy. But some soldiers modified their hats by taking off the elaborate decorations and battering in the crown to make them more comfortable. The most popular hcadwear of the entire war was the forage cap. The Government made thousands in its factories and purchased many more from contractors. The typical forage cap was made out of dark blue wool backed by an oval sheet of pasteboard to stiffen and shape the top. Forage caps were lined with cotton and the peaks were leather. A number of soldiers had the habit of pushing the peaks up, presumably because they came too far down over

Photographs showing enlisted men in shirtsleeves are comparatively rare. Note the man's braces and his shirt's baggy sleeves and small collar. This was the most common pattern of shirt found in the Civil War. David Scheinmann.

their eyes. Brass buttons held a chin strap in place at the back of the top of the peak but in practice it seems that chin straps weren't often used. Fvery four years, soldiers were scheduled to receive a black oil cloth forage cap cover as protection in bad weather. Often these cap covers didn't fit properly so men would make their own covers out of their gum blankets.

A popular forage cap accessory in the early part of the Civil War was the havelock, a piece of cloth fitted over the top of the forage cap and sometimes over the peak as well, that draped down over a soldier's neck for protection against the sun. Havelocks were named after British general Sir Henry Havelock and first worn by British troops in the scorching heat during the Indian Mutiny. Havelocks for the entire 69th New York were provided by a group of patriotic New York ladies at the beginning of the war but later their fascination waned and many were used as bandages or for straining coffee. By the later war period no havelocks were in use.

The 42nd Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry

Weston Pennsylvania

A Union soldier at the re-enactment of First Bull Run in 1995, at Weston Park, Shropshire, is pictured wearing a havelock over his forage cap. In theory, the cloth covers were meant to deflect the heat, but many soldiers found the cloth flapping around their heads uncomfortable, especially under battlefield conditions. Ron Field.

Regiment, largely lumbermen from the tough wild cat regions of Pennsylvania, had a unique way of decorating their forage caps. Each soldier of the regiment sported a strip of deerhide on his forage cap and the regiment become known as the Bucktails. Tradition has it that James Landregan of Company I was the first to put a bucktail in his cap and the rest of the regiment quickly followed suit, Bucktails were eventually adopted by an entire Bucktail Brigade formed in 1862 from the 149th and 150th Pennsylvania Infantry. The Pennsylvania originators of the Bucktail tradition sneered at these upstarts, calling them 'bogus Bucktails'.

Although never as popular as standard issue forage caps, McClellan caps were also worn by Union soldiers. These caps were of the French Chasseur pattern and with lower sides than typical forage caps, they were more of a French kepi style. The McClellan caps were popular with several Zouave regiments, like the 72nd Pennsylvania who wore McClellan caps with red piping around the crowns. High crowned forage caps were popular with some men because they could slip a sponge, hankerchief or leaves underneath as protection against the sun. Some enterprising sutlers also sold the men forage cap ventilators; pieces of brass gauze which could be pushed into the top of a forage cap to help the air circulate over the wearer's head.

Broad brimmed slouch hats were sometimes worn by the soldiers in Eastern regiments but slouch hats were more popular with Western regiments, who effected more of a rugged appearance than their Eastern counterparts. Private Rice Bull of the 123rd New York Infantry wrote: 'Western troops looked quite unlike our men. They all wore large hats instead of caps.' Straw hats were also popular in certain regiments and must have provided much relief against the sun, but they had their disadvantages. Straw hats were issued to the entire 16th New York in 1862, but the men found their unusual headgear made them easy targets and they were quickly discarded in favour of forage caps.

Knife Throwing Techniques of the Ninja

Knife Throwing Techniques of the Ninja

Knife Throwing Techniques of the Ninja. span stylecolor: 000000Do you want to learn the art of throwing knives? Ever wondered how it is done to perfection every time? Well here is your chance. This book contains well over 50 pages of detailed information and illustrations all about the art of knife throwing. This intriguing book focuses on the ninja's techniques and training. This is a must for all martial artists and anyone wanting to learn the knife throwing techniques of the ninja.span

Get My Free Ebook


Post a comment