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The Johns Hopkins University Press 2715 North Charles Street Baltimore, Maryland 21218-4363 www.press.jhu.edu Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data Roberts, William H., 1950- Civil War ironclads the U.S. Navy and industrial mobilization William H. Roberts. p. cm. (Johns Hopkins studies in the history of technology) Includes bibliographical references (p. ) and index. isbn 0-8018-6830-0 (hardcover acid-free paper) 1. Armored vessels United States History 19th century. 2. United...

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Ericsson's own group did not bid on the new harbor and river class. Two reasons may be adduced. First, most group members had plenty of work. Cornelius Delamater's Delamater Iron Works, for example, was building the machinery for the Passaic-class vessels Passaic, Catskill, and Montauk, and both the hull and the machinery for Ericsson's pet Dictator. Thomas F. Rowland's Continental Iron Works was building the hulls for the Passaic, Catskill, and Montauk, and the hull of the Puritan, as well as...

Introduction

For thousands of years, warships were built of wood and powered by human muscles and the wind. Gunpowder carved the first niche for chemical energy and machine-made materials, but successfully mounting and using cannon aboard ship still required vast amounts of timber and muscle power. In the mid nineteenth century, however, naval warfare changed dramatically. The Crimean War produced halting steps toward mechanized combat at sea, but not until the American Civil War did a navy conduct a...

Mobilization on the Ohio River

Cincinnati's waterfront was busy in late 1862. Joseph Brown and McCord amp Junger had finished the wooden-hulled riverine ironclad Chillicothe in September, and were building the similar Tuscumbia and Indianola. As winter approached, both Greenwood and Swift were working hard to begin their monitors their experiences illuminate the problems faced at one time or another by all of the monitor builders. Greenwood had rented John Litherbury's boatyard as a construction site. It was little more than...