Confederate General Service Naval and State Buttons

Uniform buttons are another great source of individuality. The Confederate states utilized respective state seals in various configurations (for example. South Carolina (100) and Virginia [107]), or used other distinctive devices. Various branch indicative letters were used in a variety of styles - block, script and Old English script -such as the "A" for artillery (21). Fine collections of Southern buttons may be viewed at the Museum of the Confederacy, the Virginia Historical Society in Richmond, Va., and the Atlanta Historical Society. In the last three decades, button collecting has become extremely sophisticated and expensive.

1-17 Staff officer's and officer's buttons;

most English imports 18-20 Enlisted man's coat and vest buttons 21-28 Artillery, various 29-35 Artillery, various 39-52 Artillery, various 53-56 Artillery, various

"WfeVWV®

1-17 Staff officer's and officer's buttons;

most English imports 18-20 Enlisted man's coat and vest buttons 21-28 Artillery, various 29-35 Artillery, various 39-52 Artillery, various 53-56 Artillery, various

Officer ButtonsMillitary Starburst Buttons

57-65 Naval officer's uniform buttons; English imports

66 Confederate Navy enlisted man's hard rubber coat button

67 Alabama Volunteer Corps coat button

68-69 Alabama State seal coat and cuff button

70 Arkansas officer's

71 Florida State seal

72 Florida Cherokee Rose

73-75 Georgia State seal coat and cuff buttons

76-77 Kentucky State seal button variations 78-82 Louisiana State seal button variations

83-84 Maryland State seal coat and cuff buttons

85 Mississippi State seal button 86-91 Mississippi star buttons 92-95 N.C. State seal buttons 96-97 N.C. Starburst variants 98-102 S C. State seal buttons 103 Tennessee State seal button 104-106 Texas buttons 107-112 Virginia State seal buttons

"c

81 62 63 ¿«v 6 ® ®®

i'©

C®X©

Tjm ®

99-

a m © © P © © ®

§5® ® £

Confederate Infantry

Millitary Starburst Buttons

AnitáCIs courtesy ol The Museum ol We Confederacy. Richmond. Va

Equipment

Confederate Infantry

What the Rebel soldier wore showed the deplorable state of Confederate supply. Scores of regiments equipped themselves locally before going to war, but as clothing and equipment wore out it was often left to the private soldier to replace it himself. Even that which the Richmond government did manage to distribute was often of wildly varying quality. Uniforms alone varied from gray so dark as to be almost blue, to butternuts and browns - all of it supposedly official "cadet gray." As for the prescribed as "regulation issue," a few regiments raised early in war ever got them at all. In time, issue of new socks would be memorable day.

Confederate uniforms can found in most Southern collections and the superb housed at The Museum of Confederacy in Richmond, Va., over one hundred items.

AnitáCIs courtesy ol The Museum ol We Confederacy. Richmond. Va

Southern Frock Coats

1 First Sergeant's frock coat

2 Forage cap

3 Linen havelock

4 Trousers for First Sergeant's frock coat

5 Uniform vest for First Sergeant's frock coat and trousers

6 Shirt

7 Cartridge box

8 Cap box

9 Fayetteville rifle

10 Brogans

11 Wooden canteen name of owner inscribed

12 Haversack

13 Model 1860 Colt Army revolver and holster

14 Side knives

Side Knives Confederate

Confederate Infantry Uniforms

4th Louisiana Infantry Uniform

These items of clothing show the rougher and more utilitarian nature of the clothing available to the Confederate soldiers, a clear reflection of the relative wealth of the two sides. All these items were taken back to England by an Englishman who had fought in the Civil War, typical of many foreigners who drift, for one reason or another, into other people's wars.

1 Confederate issue shirt

2 Louisiana nine-button frock coat.l complete with state seal buttons

3 Pair of white cotton gloves found in the I tail pocket of Louisiana frock coat item 21

4 Framed image of the owner ofl Louisiana frock coat item 2

Louisiana Shell Jacket

5 Louisiana shell jacket

6 Storage bag for framed image item 4. of owner of Louisiana frock coat item 2

7 Pair of white cotton gloves found in the tail pocket of Louisiana frock coat 6

8 Framed image of the owner of

Louisiana frock coat 6

9 Louisiana shell jacket. Like item 5, this was taken to England as a souvenir by an English Civil War participant from England.

10 Storage bag for framed image 8, of owner of Louisiana frock coat 6

Kentucky Infantry

Private, 4th Kentucky Infantry, C.S.A.

The most colorful aspects of many a Johnny Reb's garb were the bits that he brought himself from home. In the case of soldiers of the famed "Orphan Brigade," like this private in the 4th Kentucky, there was only one chance to bring something from home, for once Kentucky Confederates left the bluegrass, they never returned until the war's end, hence the name "orphans." Despite the open-ended nature of their engagement, they proved to be among the best soldiers in the Army of Tennessee. Their 1853 Enfields were seen all across the battlefields of the South, as were their distinctive short jackets, the whole uniform made of cotton, of which there was no shortage in the South. This soldier's color comes from his blanket, probably a quilt made by his mother. In late 1864 things changed dramatically for the 4th Kentucky and its sister regiments when the War Department ordered the conversion of the by-now depleted units into mounted troops. They finished the war as cavalry, something they had wanted from the very first.

Confederate Mounted

Was this article helpful?

+1 0

Responses

  • nuguse
    Did virginia enlisted artillery soliders wear virginia seal buttons?
    8 years ago

Post a comment