Guerrilla Favorite

Shotguns were popular weapons with guerrillas and troops like Mosby's Partisan Rangers They were often sawed off and used in running fights with Union cavalry troopers. A shotgun packed as much punch as a pistol and could hit more than one soldier at a time. The weapon shown here is a 12-gauge muzzle loader carried by a Confederate.

The March to the Sea

Union major general William T. Sherman's campaign to capture Atlanta was the first step in his plan to crush Georgia. His army marched south from Chattanooga, Tennessee, in the summer of 1864, fighting battle after battle with the Confederates' Army of Tennessee. Sherman penned Southern forces in Atlanta, then forced them to abandon it. His troops rested there from September 2 to November 12, then burned much of the city to the ground. From November 15 to December 20, Sherman's men marched west to the city of Savannah on Georgia's Atlantic coast. All along their route, the soldiers burned homes and towns. They took the food of civilian families and destroyed any food and crops they could not use. The civilians they left behind were usually homeless and hungry. Sherman said he wanted "to make all Georgia howl." He did. The Confederate army was unable to gather enough troops in front of Sherman's soldiers to stop them. When the Union army arrived in front of Savannah, the Confederates' Fort McAllister could not resist it and surrendered after a fifteen-minute fight. On December 21, Savannah's Confederate commander, General William J. Hardee, had his troops leave the city. Union troops paraded through the streets, celebrating their victory.

General Oliver O. Howard

General

William T. Sherman

ATLANTA'S RAILROADS DESTROYED

Confederate General John Bell Hood commanded the troops inside Atlanta. As he retreated from the city, he had his men destroy Atlanta's railroad roundhouse and burn railroad cars filled with ammunition. The explosions could be heard for miles. This photograph shows all that remained.

General Henry Slocum

General Oliver O. Howard

General

William T. Sherman

General Henry Slocum

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