Cannons Fire On Fort Sumter

Troops led by General P.G.T. Beauregard fired on Fort Sumter at 4:30 A.M. on April 11, 1861. Major Robert Anderson, his eighty-five soldiers, and forty-three laborers fought back with forty-eight cannons. The federal flag was lowered on the afternoon of April 12. The next day, a formal surrender ceremony was held. The fort's defenders were then put on ships bound for New York City. There they were welcomed as heroes.

Raising armies

Solid wood stock

Solid wood stock

Butt plate

Trigger guard

Trigger

Sling loop

Butt plate

Trigger guard

Trigger

Sling loop

April 14, 1861, was a Monday. On this day, President Lincoln heard that Fort Sumter had surrendered. He issued a call for loyal state governors to send 75,000 militia troops to protect Washington, D.C., and put down the rebellion. Over the coming years, both Abraham Lincoln and Jefferson Davis asked for volunteers every few months. In 1862, the Confederate Congress approved conscription, the drafting of men into the army. The U.S. Congress did the same in 1863. Northern states also approved paying bounties, cash awards paid to men who volunteered to serve in some new regiments. Many Northerners and Southerners objected to the draft. There were draft riots in New York City in July, 1863. But in the end, both sides put millions of soldiers in the field. North Carolina provided more Confederate army regiments than any other Southern state. New York supplied the most Northern regiments.

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