Forrests Operations in Mississippi and Tennessee march i6 November 51864

Vorupoer 1904

Smith land

Fori Anderson columbi mayfield union c1t'1

Dresden»

"McKenzie

Rutherford

_• Huntington itrentojj,

HOMboujA

Lexington

Jacksoi

Fort Pillow brownsville somerville

Bolivar memphis

Corinth iernando •

Ripley )

Holly Springs ineville

¿Crossrot iOxford

¡i Tupelo i® '•ok0l0na pursuit. Forrest's brilliant victory resulted in Federal losses of 617, with 1,618 captured, while the Confederates lost 492.

On July 5 Sherman sent Major General Andrew J. Smith with 14,000 Federal troops into Mississippi in a further attempt to intercept Forrest and protect Federal supply lines. Smith advanced south from La Grange, cutting a swath of destruction as he went. To halt Smith, General S.D. Lee joined Forrest, and with a total of 9,460 men, attacked Smith at Harrisburg near Tupelo on July 14. In several uncoordinated frontal assaults, the Confed-erates suffered a bloody repulse from the entrenched Federals. But, short of rations and ammunition, Smith withdrew the next day, pursued by Forrest. In a sharp rearguard action along Old Town Creek, Forrest was shot in the foot, which put him out of action. Although he had not destroyed Forrest, Smith badly crippled Lee's Confederates and protected Sherman's supply line.

On August 21, fully recovered from his wound, and hoping to forestall another

In 1864 Nathan Bedford Forrest, exhibited the military genius and ferocity which made him one of the most outstanding cavalry leaders of the Civil War.

During March and April, Forrest's cavalry raided Federal installations in Kentucky and Tennessee. On April 12, he attacked the 580-man garrison at Fort Pillow. When the fort refused to surrender, 1,500 Confederates stormed the earthwork and quickly subdued the mixed garrison of white Tennessee "Unionists" and black soldiers. Forrest lost 100, but captured 226 Federals, killed 231, ^nd wounded 100. Forrest was publicly accused in the North of allowing his men to murder black soldiers after they had surrendered.

Afraid that Forrest would raid his vital rail supply lines in middle Tennessee, General Sherman ordered General Sturgis into northern Mississippi to locate and eliminate Forrest's cavalry. On June 2, Sturgis left Memphis with 8,100 infantry, cavalry and 20 cannon.

In Alabama, en route to raid Tennessee railroads, Forrest was ordered back to meet Sturgis. On June 10, he intercepted Sturgis's 3,300 cavalry near Brice's Crossroads. By early afternoon, the Federal infantry, exhausted by a rapid march, arrived to relieve the cavalry. Fighting was intense in the dense underbrush. The Federal infantry, disastrously outflanked, panicked and fled across the Hatchie River, with Forrest in hot

(J^) March 16: Forrest begins raids

; March 24: Confederate cavalry seizes Union City, capturing 500 Federal

March 25: Forrest demands surrender of v ^ Fort Anderson at Paducah, but Federals refuse. Cavalry force attacks fort, but is repulsed. Confederates withdraw

^ March 29: At Bolivar, Confederate cavalry — rout Federal cavalry, lorciiig it to flee to

July 5 -13: Gen. Smith, sent to intercept

Forrest, advances south from La Grange. Enters Tupelo on 13th

/jo) July 13: Lee joins Forrest at Okolona and they overhaul Smith at Harrisburg. Federals spend night erecting breastworks

/fy July 14: Engagement at Tupelo (see map right)

(12) Augl8-20: Forrest masses his raiders at Oxford, then proceeds to Hernando

(13) Aug 21: Forrest raids Memphis

14 ; Oct 19 - November 3: Forrest leaves Corinth for Fort Heiman and Paris Landing. Captures and burns Federal ships and installations. Federals retaliate

, Nov 4: Using artillery, Forrest bombards — Johnsonville with devastating effectiveness. Withdraws on 5th (see map far right)

©April 12: Forrest attacks and captures Fort Pillow (see map right)

\ June 2-9: Gen. Sturgis leaves Memphis to locate Forrest. Arrives near Brice's Crossroads on the 9 th

New Madrid

/"j\ June 6-9: In Alabama, Forrest learns of Sturgis's pursuit and returns to Tupelo; meets with his superior, Gen. S.D. Lee, at Booneville to make battle plans

(gI" \ June 10: Battle of Brice's Crossroads (see map top right). Forrest pursues fleeing Federals until 12th

Was this article helpful?

0 0

Post a comment