Km

20 Miles il corps cross Big between

I cavalrv, Federal :kson y crosses Pearl rd Meridian To t, digs in near

:uate their at toward

!s through ccupies nfederate iply center - on

.k havoc on

:t further for om Memphis, lian and starts

Is Col. Winslow's 1; fails to locate lan at Canton

Ian ton to

's cavalry leaves

Tallahatchie lidge. Meets jades near West h town.

is nerve; forced a and then to ivs to Memphis ions expedition ends Yazoo City

\ecl/ard Forrest {above}, gegjèrally believed to

Crow haf griffis

►"valdosta

ffoltinson Frrry madison iSBMODl olustee

February 20, 1.864

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hfl&townf«, iROLLESTOàv arend tóra/we irütjjhüie in the faee^of the"Vnson approaci), ! Brig. cphFi/regüa atta-ckeijjj*é three advancing\

Federal cohiaea^■QhiTTtfy. Two Unión iegibjékts gave way almpskim-m eat a tlj> and remforcement^.iuere called-tip by b^ih\idéf:AJfdusk Seymonr abandoned the fight and r(niealed^krpalclwin. leaving five cannon in Confederate hands (seeynap left). ,

Old hitilst'

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20 miles been reinforced, Smith retired to Okolona on the 21st. Forrest followed, assailed the Union rearguard, and in the ensuing battle, defeated Smith who hurried back to Memphis.

The Lincoln administration now made plans to occupy Jacksonville and the west bank of the St. Johns River: Lincoln saw the expedition as a step toward the restoration of Florida to the Union, while the military wanted to recruit soldiers into their black units.

On February 5, Brigadier General Truman Seymour's Federals sailed from Port Royal Sound and occupied Jacksonville without opposition. On the 8th, Seymour's cavalry, led by Colonel Guy Henry, struck inland and after twice engaging the Confederates, reached Baldwin. Following a bitter skirmish, Henry crossed St. Mary's River at

FebiS: Gen. Seymour's 6,000 Federals sail from Port Royal, S. Carolina

Feb 7: Seymour enters St. John's River, lands and occupies Jacksonville

Feb. 8: Federal cavalnt. led by Col. Henry advances inland, skirmishes with Confederates; occupies Camp Finegan

Barber's Ferry, but was opposed near Lake City by some 600 Confederates. Although he outnumbered the enemy, Henry retreated to Barber's Ferry. While awaiting reinforcements, the Confederates advanced to Olustee on the 13th, and threw up earthworks.

On February 20, ignoring orders not to advance beyond Barber's Ferry, Seymour -with 5,500 men set off to capture Lake City. The Confederates, now reinforced to 5,200, intercepted and attacked the Federals near Olustee. The battle continued until dusk, when the Federals retreated to Baldwin. Federal losses were 1,861; Confederates 934.

jT^'j? 1 be we gi-Mtesi cavdhy leader ofjhe.war, enlisted as a iCtj^S^ * private at \hJ outbreak of hostilities but bad risen to the rank ofptpjpr general by the tun,e of bis encounter with

Feb. 10: Henry clashes with "— Confederates at Barber's Ferry; crosses South Fork of St. Mary's River

Feb. 11: Henry contnues toward Lake City; opposed by some 600 Confederates. Retreats to Barber's Fern'

' g Feb. 13: Confederates dig in at W Olustee

' y Feb. 13-17: Union troopers under

^ Capl. Marshall raid Gainsvillc

— Lake City. Attacked bv Confederates in

After the Union defeat the previous day, Banks anticipated further Confederate assaults and drew up his forces in a defensive line at Pleasant Hill. Light skirmishing was succeeded by a full scale Confederate attack in the late afternoon. Initially pushed back, the Federals rallied and counterattacked eventually forcing the Confederates from the field. Union casualties were 1,369, Confederate 1,626.

The U.S.S. Osage (left), part of the fleet which Admiral Porter boasted could operate "wherever the sand was damp " In fact,, the fleet came perilously close to being stranded when the Red River's water levels began to fall with unexpected rapidity.

After the Union defeat the previous day, Banks anticipated further Confederate assaults and drew up his forces in a defensive line at Pleasant Hill. Light skirmishing was succeeded by a full scale Confederate attack in the late afternoon. Initially pushed back, the Federals rallied and counterattacked eventually forcing the Confederates from the field. Union casualties were 1,369, Confederate 1,626.

The U.S.S. Osage (left), part of the fleet which Admiral Porter boasted could operate "wherever the sand was damp " In fact,, the fleet came perilously close to being stranded when the Red River's water levels began to fall with unexpected rapidity.

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