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While encouraging his men to hold their positons, Gen. John B. Hood was struck in the leg by a Union minie. ball. Already crippled by a wound from Gettysburg, this further injury necessitated the amputation of a leg.

Union Private A. van Lisle at Chickamauga.

w e see a flash, as of sheet lightning; we hear the report; we see our comrades falling, some never to rise again; some mortally wounded, weltering in blood, others crippled and writhing in agony... The battle is on in earnest.

Union Private A. van Lisle at Chickamauga.

the left under General Longstreet and the right under General Polk - Bragg ordered a coordinated attack with the right wing to commence at dawn. Delayed by poor staff work for four hours, the attack stalled after achieving momentary success. The movement of Federal reserves northward, however, opened a gap in Rosecrans's line that was exploited by the Confederate left wing. The Federal right collapsed, forcing Rosecrans and other senior commanders from the field. Undismayed, Thomas rallied the remaining Federals around Snodgrass Hill and Kelly Field, and held his ground until nightfall. Battered, but not decisively beaten, the Army of the Cumberland withdrew into Chattanooga. Bragg had inflicted 16,170 casualties on the Federal army and had held the field, but in turn he had paid a heavy price - 18,454 Confederate casualties - and despite all the determination and sacrifice of the Army of the Tennessee, Chatanooga still remained firmly in Federal hands.

While encouraging his men to hold their positons, Gen. John B. Hood was struck in the leg by a Union minie. ball. Already crippled by a wound from Gettysburg, this further injury necessitated the amputation of a leg.

Twelve-year-old drummer-boy Johnny Clem who was promoted to the rank of sergeant for felling a rebel colonel who was pursuing him on horseback (above).

fFM'e'Battje-df'(right). One Union officer reported that$U'e dead lay in such masses that the ■ground beneath them was scarcely visible and that the Chickamauga ran red with blood.

fFM'e'Battje-df'(right). One Union officer reported that$U'e dead lay in such masses that the ■ground beneath them was scarcely visible and that the Chickamauga ran red with blood.

Unpopular with both his officers and men, Gen. Braxton Bragg (above) was argumentative, irritable and extremely critical of his subordinates. His friendship with Jefferson Davis and the reputation which he gained during the Mexican War, ensured his commission as a brigadier general at the outbreak of hostilities. Despite his less attractive characteristics, Grant would later call him " remarkably intelligent and well-informed".

Owing his appointment to his political background rather than to proven military ability, the initial Northern confidence in the abilities of William Starke Rosecrans (above) rapidly began to decline. Though conscientious and well-intentioned, Rosecrans lacked .. the resolution and decisiveness essential in a„generai' officer. His replacement by the capable GeoFge Thomas came as a relief to his subordinates^"

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