Popular Ideology

Another precondition to the Civil War in Missouri stemmed from the relations of Missourians to outsiders. Part of the power of the emerging American Northeast was expressed in the ability of the popular press there to create and broadcast images of Southerners and Westerners, particularly of poor whites, that attacked traditional smallholders for their supposed backwardness. Racing toward progress defined as industrialization, urbanization, education, and personal orderliness and accumulation...

Introduction

The attack came at any Missouri farmyard, any night. Two men dressed in Federal uniforms came and knocked at our door and said they wanted to warm. Tom told them to go round to the other door and then without thinking let them in. They jumped on Tom with their pistols and demanded his revolver. He told them he had none. They said there*was one here and they would have it. Tom had to get Mat's which John had. I was very scared and sorry John had got up and let them in. They shot Mr. Jones...

Illustrations

Map Towns With Names

Odon Guitar, Union brigadier general and guerrilla hunter, 119 W. A. Depriest, a guerrilla chief of Missouri, 133 John McCorkle and J. B. Harris, guerrillas, 134 Bill Anderson, known in legend as Bloody Bill, 135 A pair of Butternuts who only want to be let alone, 159 Road scene in Southwest Missouri, 217 Reunion of Quantrill's Raiders, 257, 258 Political map of Missouri with counties and county seats Political map of Missouri with counties and county seats

Guerrilla Acts of Terror

No one, North or South, anticipated the duration or devastation of the American Civil War. At the start, Lincoln federalized 75,000 state militia troops for ninety days, long enough to defeat the foe in one glorious battle. Lacking standing armies and bureaucratic structures, both governments had to improvise the unexpected major war which ground into being. Creating, manning, supplying, and transporting organized armies strained the resources of both sections. Yet these armies actually fought...

Sense of Justice

The most direct and spontaneous response to an attack was to fight back. However, when the attacker held the upper hand, even if only temporarily, fighting back most likely would lead to disaster. If one's neighbors and community opposed disturbances of the peace and violation of property, one might rally these immediate allies. However, in most of Missouri during the Civil War, communities were usually divided and fought among themselves. One might appeal to outside authorities either...