Homestead and Survival Books

The Lost Ways

This complete ebook is the best way to survive if you are ever left without power. Would it not be better to spend just a bit of money in order to gain the ability to survive with you and your family if you are ever left without power for a long time? If a terrorist attack involved an EMP, you would be left without power for days or weeks. You can learn how to get back the lost ways or your forefathers and mothers, and learn how to survive totally without power and get back the survivalist skills that used to be a huge part of how we now survive in a world without power. This book comes to your from survivalist Claude Davis, and the skills that you will learn will save your life and give you the ability to survive as long as you need to in the wild and at home, no matter what the world outside is like. Continue reading...

The Lost Ways Summary

Rating:

4.8 stars out of 59 votes

Contents: Ebook
Author: Claude Davis
Price: $37.00

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My The Lost Ways Review

Highly Recommended

The author has done a thorough research even about the obscure and minor details related to the subject area. And also facts weren’t just dumped, but presented in an interesting manner.

When compared to other e-books and paper publications I have read, I consider this to be the bible for this topic. Get this and you will never regret the decision.

The Lost Ways 2

Our evolution has made us what we are right now. We have amenities for everything. However, what we lack, or rather have lost, are the ways that our ancestors used to survive harsh calamities. They didn't rely on anyone but did everything themselves from harvesting to building houses, and everything in between. Some of the ancient civilizations created innovative ways that even pay off if they are followed. Three of them are the superfoods created out of simple ingredients. These foods contain nutrients that could keep you in vitals for longer than anticipated. They could prove to be your life saviors in times of peril and this is exactly what the book The Lost Ways 2 intend. A sequel to The Lost Ways 1, this book contains much more than just superfood recipes. It has instructions on building charcoal filters, kilns, log houses, medicine making, harvesting, hunting and using parts of your game as raw material to make necessary tools, and much more. Besides this, you can get two bonus reports. One on using 4 acres of land for self-sufficiency and the other one on getting prepared for an imminent EMP attack. Continue reading...

The Lost Ways 2 Summary

Contents: Ebook
Author: Claude Davis
Price: $37.00

Homesteading For Preppers

Dan F. Sullivan together with other successful homesteaders created this great guide called autopilot homestead. After years of prepping, he came to the conclusion that the only way to have a solid, steady food and water supply is to Homestead. He is popular for his website, survivalsullivan.com, where writers post regular, high quality articles on a variety of topics ranging from homesteading to prepping. He started to homestead when he was only six years old, so you can see that he has a lot of experience in him which he is willing to share in this great book. This product is digital that comes in e-book and PDFs. It comes with four bonuses. The first bonus is the Autopilot homestead action plan, to assist you put all the practices in the main course to practice. The second bonus is a collection of a dozen PDFs of daily, weekly, and monthly planning sheets for records. The third bonus is called 37 ways to boost your energy, due to the workload of the job, a homesteader needs to be energized. The last bonus is called the amazing house of remedies, to enable you treat the injuries sustained during the job. This guide is for all planning to homestead or those who have started already. You do not require any special skill to be able to homestead, just download this guide and follow the steps. Continue reading...

Homesteading For Preppers Summary

Contents: Ebooks
Author: Dan Sullivan
Official Website: www.shtfhomestead.com
Price: $53.00

North South tensions grow

In the North, on the other hand, the free states were struggling on several fronts. The so-called Panic of 1857 caused a severe business depression throughout the North. This in turn led Northern political leaders to call for higher tariffs (government-imposed payments) on imported goods and a homestead act that would encourage development of the western territories. But these efforts to reenergize Northern businesses were not popular in the South, and they were stopped by Southern lawmakers and President James Buchanan (17911868), a Pennsylvania Democrat who was friendly to the South.

The Frontier A Place and a Concept

Another line was recognized by Americans the line of demarcation between East and West based on climate and geography. The Great Plains, formerly described as the Great American Desert, was an arid, flat, inhospitable area, totally unlike anything Americans had experienced between the Atlantic coastline and the Mississippi River. The dividing line was almost arbitrarily set at the 100th meridian, roughly five miles west of Fort Dodge, Kansas, because the average rainfall beyond that longitude measured less than 20 inches per year. Homesteading and town building on the Great Plains represented a whole new phase in the settlement of the West.

Lecture Forty One The Northern Home FrontJI

Examination of the economy and the nonmilitary Republican legislative agenda. Unlike the Confederacy, the North proved able to outfit and provision its armies while producing ample consumer goods. It accomplished this with only modest inflation and minimal government interference. Labor-saving machines allowed agricultural production to soar despite the absence of hundreds of thousands of men. Water transport increased, and railroads carried far more goods and improved their tracks and rolling stock. The textile industry suffered because of reduced access to southern cotton, but other segments of the industrial economy exceeded prewar production, and mechanization in factories increased. Most of the technology that allowed the economy to do so well was already in place when war broke out. The conflict did mark a radical shift of national wealth toward the North. While the southern economy largely lay in ruins in 1865, northern production was healthy and growing. The Republicans passed...

The Effects of War on the Economy

How the Union and Confederacy paid, or did not pay, for this war played an important role in the nation's economic recovery after secession as well as how urban Americans experienced the war. The federal government that had to that point intruded little on the lives of its individual citizens suddenly became the largest and most dominating economic entity. For the Union, dealing successfully with an economic enterprise never imagined even a year before meant reshaping how the government raised revenue. Secretary of the Treasury Salmon P. Chase, with the help of Philadelphia financier Jay Cooke, developed a play by which the United States would finance the war through the sale of bonds, issuing paper currency known as greenbacks, increasing tariffs and excise taxes, and instituting the nation's first income tax. The Thirty-seventh Congress approved Chase's financial plan and extended the basic framework for the Republican economic program, which was in large part an updated version of...

Drought Rain and Snow

Drought was almost common on the Great Plains, where less than 20 inches of rain fell in good years. Nevertheless, eager homesteaders disregarded the climatic warning signs as they swarmed over the region after the Civil War. The conventional wisdom, disingenuously encouraged by railroads with land to sell, was Rain follows the plow Turning the soil, planting trees, and other agricultural activities retarded evaporation and thereby shortened the rain cycle. It was all pseudoscience, of course, but it was accepted as gospel by thousands of homesteaders. Drought's effects did not stop with parching the land and withering the crops as one Kansas editor wrote, A drought nourishes chinch bugs, sun-strokes, grasshoppers and profanity.

The siege of Vicksburg

Lever Wheel Gears

Citizens of new england and the Midwest were stunned when the Southern states left the Union. Many had believed their family of states would never break up. When Confederates fired on Fort Sumter and the flag of the United States, that shock turned to anger. From Minneapolis to Philadelphia, people shouted for revenge. Men answered President Lincoln's call for army volunteers immediately But unhappy Northerners had to wait for more than two years to hear about a satisfying military victory. Until July, 1863, Union armies were often losers on the battlefield. Through that period, the North's real success was on the homefront. Industries in Northern towns employed extra men and, in some places, allowed women into the workplace. Immigrants kept flowing into towns in Union states, and after President Lincoln signed the Homestead Act of 1862, many others headed west to make new homes on free frontier land. Theater performances, books,

Guerrillas And The Civilian Populations

Quantrill And His Men

Union soldiers frequently tried to entrap civilians by showing up at their homes pretending to be guerrillas, and then trying to extract information about the whereabouts of real guerrillas or civilian sympathizers. Nor could civilians even be sure of the identity of men in blue by the middle of the war many guerillas had Union uniforms, plundered from supply trains or stripped from dead bodies. Often guerrillas would show up at a homestead dressed in blue and question the residents about

The Key Note of Freedom

Because Lincoln's renomination was so secure, the convention spent most of its energy reshaping the party's image. One of the major efforts in that direction was the Republicans' christening of themselves as the National Union Party. Union parties had formed at the county and state level since the beginning of the war. Generally conceived of as provisional organizations, they combined people of any political background willing to support the war. Lincoln had endorsed and nurtured these organizations, knowing that they would widen his administration's constituency in the years to come. Few people expected these loose coalitions to last beyond the war, however, so when the Republicans at Baltimore presented themselves as the National Union Party, most observers likewise doubted the staying power of the alliance between regular Republicans and pro-Lincoln War Democrats.28 Yet for many Republicans, the new name reflected a genuine desire to restyle the party that had been created in the...

What happened next

News of Grant's victory spread from big cities to the most remote homestead. Abolitionists expressed delight that slavery would finally be abolished from America, while Unionists sang and danced to celebrate the restoration of the United States. But most of all, people celebrated because Lee's surrender meant that the long years of violence and bloodshed were finally coming to an end.

A selfmade man

In 1843, the popular and ambitious young Democrat was elected to the U.S. Congress. He ended up serving five terms in the House of Representatives. He was best known for his support of the Homestead Act, which would grant 160 acres of public land in the West to any family that wanted to settle it. Many wealthy Southerners and fellow Democrats opposed this idea. Some of them wanted the Western lands for themselves, while others wanted the government to sell the land rather than giving it away. But Johnson felt it was important for poor people to have access to land of their own so that they would be able to improve their lives, as he had done. He continued pushing the bill until it finally passed many years later.

Finances

Eliminated state banknotes from circulation. The Union continued to provide for its citizens on the home front by making western lands available to free white settlers in the Homestead Act, and in the Pacific Railroad Act provided governmental support for the construction of the transcontinental railroad that had brought about bleeding Kansas in the mid-1850s.

The Far West

The Civil War hardly provided a respite from the recurrent warfare that had plagued the Southwest and Plains in the 1850s. Instead, the Indian wars of the antebellum era continued ''while public attention has been completely absorbed with the Rebellion'' (''The Sioux War'' 1863, 695). There, the formal and informal wars waged by the United States and its citizens on Native Americans had little to do with the central issues that elsewhere defined the era of the Civil War. Instead, recurring acts of reciprocal violence resulted as American ranchers, miners, and settlers intruded on Native American territory. The onslaught of new settlers to California and the west in 1849, after the discovery of gold, brought untold disruptions to Native American societies who suffered as western settlers looted their way through their lands and coerced others into providing labor or supplies. In 1866, the Apache leader Cochise remarked that

Hand Grenade

Citizens of new england and the Midwest were stunned when the Southern states left the Union. Many had believed their family of state would never break up. When Confederates fired on Fort Sumter and the flag of the United States, that shock turned to anger. From Minneapolis to Philadelphia, people shouted for revenge. Men answered President Lincoln's call for army volunteers immediately. But unhappy Northerners had to wait for more than two years to hear about a satisfying military victory. Until July, 1863, Union armies were often losers on the battlefield. Through that period, the North's real success was on the homefront. Industries in Northern towns employed extra men and, in some places, allowed women into the workplace. immigrants kept flowing into towns in Union states, and after President Lincoln signed the Homestead Act of 1862, many others headed west to make new homes on free frontier land. Theater performances, books,

Societies at war

Eliminated state banknotes from circulation. The Union continued to prov ide for its citizens on the home front by making western lands available to free white settlers in the Homestead Act, and in the Pacific Railroad Act provided governmental support for the construction of the transcontinental railroad that had brought about bleeding Kansas in the mid-1850s.

25 of Grandpas Top Tips

25 of Grandpas Top Tips

Everything from making a Camp Stove that you can Carry in Your Pocket and a Magical Fish Bait Formula to Get the Big Ones! through to How to Make an Emergency Clothes Brush.

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