New York

When lilt' Federal government requested troops to put down the rebellion, New York sent 11 of its militia regiments to Washington, and called for another 30,000 volunteer militia for two years' service. Those went into ncwlv organised regiments.

New York's governor cabled the Secretary of War on 28 June 1861 that he had 'already contracted for the making of 10,000 suits of uniforms with two parties, 2,500 to be delivered this week, of the best army goods, at $16.50 per suit, and for 20,000 caps, with capes and covers complete, at 75 cents'. These uniforms were to conform to the state's'Act of April 16, 1861':

'That the uniform of the troops should consist ' 1st. Of a jacket ofdark blue army cloth, cut to

New Jersey's Rifle Corps wore grey uniform jackets with standing collars, grey trousers, and grey képis with dark blue or black bands around them. The Corps was raised for state defence. (Author's collection)

flow from the waist and to fall about four inches below the belt. The coat to be buttoned with eight buttons, from the throat to the waist. The collar to be a low standing collar. The buttons are to be those of the stale militia. . .

'2nd. Of trowsers, to be made of light arm\ blue, cut full in the leg and large around the foot...

'3rd. Of an overcoat of light army blue, of the pattern worn by the U.S. infantry. . .

Collonel New York Regiment

Lieutenant-Colonel Eli R. Lyon, 43rd New York State Militia Regiment, was photographed just prior to the war in the State's 1858 regulation uniform—the standard when the war began. It is virtually the same as the US Army uniform apart from state insignia. Lyon wears a two-piece belt plate and a presentation sword. (Michael McAfee collection)

Lieutenant-Colonel Eli R. Lyon, 43rd New York State Militia Regiment, was photographed just prior to the war in the State's 1858 regulation uniform—the standard when the war began. It is virtually the same as the US Army uniform apart from state insignia. Lyon wears a two-piece belt plate and a presentation sword. (Michael McAfee collection)

New Jersey's Rifle Corps wore grey uniform jackets with standing collars, grey trousers, and grey képis with dark blue or black bands around them. The Corps was raised for state defence. (Author's collection)

Breech Loading Cap Tins

'4th. Of a fatigue cap of dark blue, with a water-proof cover, to be made with a cape which will fall to the shoulder. The cover to be buttoned at the visor, and furnished with strings, so that it may be tied under the chin. . .

'Each soldier should be provided with two canton-flannel shirts, two pair canton-flannel drawers, two pair woolen socks, one pair stout cowhide pegged shoes and one double Mackinac blanket. The board would suggest that the Commissioned officers of this force be uniformed according to the bill of dress for officers already established by the general regulations.'

Therefore, on 16 April 1861, Pte. Joseph Favillof the 71st New York Infantry Regiment noted in his diary that the unit was to report to a clothing store the next day, 'there to be measured, each and all of us, for a uniform suit, to consist of dark blue jacket and sky-blue trousers. The jacket will have light blue shoulderstraps and cuffs'.

This jacket, as most commonly issued to New York volunteers, was short, dark blue, with a standing collar fastened with a hook-and-eye in front, and trimmed with wide light blue piping. On jackets made later the piping was of a medium, almost blue-green colour, and was thinner than the thicker cords used on the first jackets. There was a strap passing from the shoulder seam to a button next to the collar on each shoulder; these were also trimmed in light blue, as was a left-side 'belt keeper' tab. Small New York state buttons were used on these. There were eight large New York state buttons in a single row down the front, although examples with seven and nine buttons are also known to have been made.

The jackets were lined in the breast with brown

The 69th New York State Militia Regiment parades in New York upon its return from the Battle of First Bull Run. In the engraving the regimental number can clearly be seen on the slouch hat of the private holding the bouquet in the centre of the front rank. See Plate Ga. (Author's collection)

The 69th New York State Militia Regiment parades in New York upon its return from the Battle of First Bull Run. In the engraving the regimental number can clearly be seen on the slouch hat of the private holding the bouquet in the centre of the front rank. See Plate Ga. (Author's collection)

69th New York InfantryGen Alexander Shaler

Major Alexander Shaler wears the uniform of the famous 7th New York State Militia Regiment, from which he resigned in June 1861. The 7th was the first regiment to reach Washington after pro-Southerners had cut its communications at the beginning of the war. (David Scheinmann collection)

(many units were given a choice of the state jacket I or US frock coat). They served as dress coats, being I issued and worn until at least October 1864, when I troops of the 120th New York Volunteer Infantn I

This private wears the Chasseur uniform adopted by the 12th I New York State Militia Regiment in 1861. The dark blue I uniform is trimmed with light blue; trousers are sky blue; leggings are of russet leather; and the kepi is light blue with 2 dark blue band, white cord trim, and the brass number '12' in ' front. The 12th served three months' active scrvice starting in May 1861, and behaved well in a skirmish near Martinsburg, Virginia, on 12 July before being mustered out. (David Scheinmann collection)

Major Alexander Shaler wears the uniform of the famous 7th New York State Militia Regiment, from which he resigned in June 1861. The 7th was the first regiment to reach Washington after pro-Southerners had cut its communications at the beginning of the war. (David Scheinmann collection)

polished cotton stiffened with burlap, with dark-coloured twill tape sewn over the back seams. A 'slash' pocket lined in brown polished cotton was usually worn over the left breast, normally large enough to hold a small Bible or a diary. The sleeves had two small state buttons on each cuff, although they were for appearance only—the cuff could not be opened. Sleeves were lined with white muslin.

As was often the case, not enough blue material was immediately available for all the volunteers, and New York had to obtain 7,300 cadet grey 'mixed satinet'jackets and trousers for many of its men. Most of these were poorly made of inferior materials and wore out quickly.

The blue state jackets were issued to the 1st to 105th New York Regiments before the US Army took over the task of providing its uniforms. Artillery regiments from the 1st to the 4th, plus a number of batteries, received the same jackets trimmed in red. They were very popular items, and other units took them into use whenever possible

Regiment (which was not one of the regiments supposed to have been issued them) were photographed wearing them.

On 16 May 1863 New York issued a general order calling for a single state militia uniform. Each militia regiment could wear a dark bluejacket with nine state buttons dow n the front, a standing collar and pointed cuffs trimmed white. Two styles were authorised: a Chasseur style, and a 'polka jacket'. Trousers were 'light indigo blue kersey', with edging around the pockets for those units with Chasseur jackets. Caps were dark blue képis piped in white, orange, green, or scarlet. A state coat of arms in brass under a red, white, and blue pompon was worn by enlisted men on the cap front. Mounted units wore the US mounted jackets with dress caps or black broad-brimmed hats. These uniforms began to be issued in large quantities (5,000) in 1864.

The state coat of arms also appeared on buttons worn by officers and men. The sword belt plate for all officers, non-commissioned officers, musicians and mounted privates was 'gilt, rectangular, two inches wide, with a raised bright rim; a silver wreath of laurel and palm encircling the letters "NY" in old English characters in silver'. New York's heavy artillerymen also wore a two-piece belt plate with the Roman letters 'SNY' on the male part. Enlisted foot soldiers wore US Army-style oval brass belt plates and cartridge box plates marked in Roman letters 'SNY'. Most of the men who enlisted for two

The 8th New York State Militia Regiment, photographed here near Washington during the regiment's three months' active service in 1861, wore cadet grey jackets, trousers and kepis with black trim. The cross belt plate worn by the soldier on the extreme right bears the insignia of a bust of Washington within a wreath. Note the full haversack with a tin cup buckled to its flap and the blanket roll worn by the soldier in the centre; and the axe carried by, apparently, a pioneer. (Michael McAfee collection)

Black Pioneers Regiment

years in 1861 wore this plate. Other units, such as the iooth Infantry Regiment, also wore them whenever they could get them, and they have been found at sites dating from 1864, indicating their use late in the war.

In 1861 New York bought or acquired 25,540 M1842 muskets, 20,397 P1858 Enfields, 5,000 0.54-cal. Austrian rifled muskets, and several thousand more US-made and imported longarms.

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