Wisconsin

Volunteer companies formed by Irish-American communities in the Badger State - the Mulligan Guards from Kenosha, the Emmet Guards from Dodge, and the Peep O'Day Boys from Racine - went into the 17th Wisconsin Infantry Regiment ("Wisconsin Irish Brigade"), organized in Madison in March 1862 under Col John L. Doran of Milwaukee. The 17th Wisconsin served in the Western theater; during Grant's defensive operations in fall 1862 it spearheaded a furious bayonet charge at Corinth on October 3, shouting the Gaelic war-cry, "Faugh a ballagh!" ("Clear the way!"). Later it saw service at Champion's Hill, Vicksburg, and in the Atlanta campaign. The issued clothing was conventional, and men of the regiment sometimes wore the black dress hat; the original Dresden rifles were replaced with Springfields later in 1862. The regiment carried a distinctive Irish flag (see below).

Col St Clair A. Mulholland, 116th Pennsylvania Infantry, t of the Congressional

Col St Clair A. Mulholland, 116th Pennsylvania Infantry, t of the Congressional

regulation gauntlet gloves. (US Army Mil Hist Inst; Civil W Library & Museum, MOLLUS, Philadelphia, PA)

LEFT TbĀ« flag had a got center, above ribands with gold lettering proclaim "FAUQ A BALAC" at the top and "WISCONSIN IRISH BRIGADE" at the bottom; note that the triple-tailed tips of

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