Confederate Infantry Uniforms

These items of clothing show the rougher and more utilitarian nature of the clothing available to the Confederate soldiers, a clear reflection of the relative wealth of the two sides. All these items were taken back to England by an Englishman who had fought in the Civil War, typical of many foreigners who drift, for one reason or another, into other people's wars.

Civil War Marine Frock

Artifacts courtesy of Don Tro<»n, Collection. Southbury. Conn

1 Confederate issue shirt

2 Louisiana nine-button frock coat,! complete with state seal buttons

3 Pair of white cotton gloves found in the I tail pocket of Louisiana frock coat item 2

4 Framed image of the owner of 1 Louisiana frock coat item 2

Artifacts courtesy of Don Tro<»n, Collection. Southbury. Conn

5 Louisiana shell |acket

6 Storage bag for framed image item 4. of owner of Louisiana frock coat item 2

7 Pair of white cotton gloves found in the tail pocket of Louisiana frock coat 6

8 Framed image of the owner of

Louisiana frock coat 6

9 Louisiana shell jacket. Like item 5, this was taken to England as a souvenir by an English Civil War participant from England

10 Storage bag for framed image 8. of owner of Louisiana frock coat 6

Uniform English Civil War RoundheadsOrphan Brigade

Private, 4th Kentucky Infantry, C.S.A.

The most colorful aspects of many a Johnny Reb's garb were the bits that he brought himself from home. In the case of soldiers of the famed "Orphan Brigade," like this private in the 4th Kentucky, there was only one chance to bring something from home, for once Kentucky Confederates left the bluegrass, they never returned until the war's end, hence the name "orphans." Despite the open-ended nature of their engagement, they proved to be among the best soldiers in the Army of Tennessee. Their 1853 Enfields were seen all across the battlefields of the South, as were their distinctive short jackets, the whole uniform made of cotton, of which there was no shortage in the South. This soldier's color comes from his blanket, probably a quilt made by his mother. In late 1864 things changed dramatically for the 4th Kentucky and its sister regiments when the War Department ordered the conversion of the by-now depleted units into mounted troops. They finished the war as cavalry, something they had wanted from the very first.

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