Balfour Of Burleigh Maiden Crest

Strathbogie Brigade

STRATHBOGIE REGIMENT, ABERDEEN,1644 1: Ensign 2: Drummer 3: Pikeman

Strathbogie Regiment Parliamentary Army Musketeers

PRESTON,1648 1: Musketeer, Fraser's Firelocks 2: Ensign, Keith's Regiment 3: Lancer

Strathbogie Regt17th Century Clothing Herbert Knotel

sojour in the day. It is a measure of the increasing poverty that three years later the Earl of Lothian's only asked for 12 shillings per week, but even this bargain offer proved too much; and it was only when the demand was repeated a month later, this time with menaces, that the money was forthcoming.

Threats were also necessary in England. In 1644 and afterwards the English Parliament should have paid the Scots £21,000 sterling every month for the upkeep of Leven's army. Not surprisingly, this formidable sum was rarely forthcoming, and this in turn meant that the Scots army had frequent recourse to free quarters and plundering, or at the very least demanding 'subsistence money' from the local authorities. At times this got dangerously close to the German practice of Brandschaating, or armed extortion; but while the Parliament vigorously protested at the resultant abuses, no real effort was made to alleviate the situation.

Garrisons presented their own problems. The armies, rapacious as they were, could usually be counted upon to move on before the local economy was irretrievably ruined. A garrison on the other hand was a permanent fixture, and in order to curb some pretty outrageous behaviour the Estates published the following set of regulations on 7 November 1645:

(1) That each regiment or garrison has a local assignation on some shire or shires for paying its quarterings and entertainment out of the monthly maintenance of October and November 1645 only.

(2) That each regiment appoint a collector, who must be resident within the shire, to receive what is flue from each shire and heritor (landowner).

(3) That the collectors receive rolls of what is due from each heritor from the shire committees of war or the previous collectors, and appoint a day (at least ten days after intimation is given) for bringing in the maintenance to the collector. The names of any who fail to pay are to be reported to the shire committee of war, which shall give warrant for free quarterings on the deficients (unless they have just reasons for not paving anything). If the shire committee and the collector fail to give up the rolls of what is due, soldiers shall be quartered on them.

(4) Every officer and soldier must pay for what he gets in meat or provisions for men and horses.

(5) The allowance in quarters for each trooper shall be three quarters of oats or corn for each horse at 6 shillings and 8 pence a peck, 2 shillings for straw every 24 hours, and 8 shillings a day for his own meat and drink.

(6) That no violence be offered to anv man, woman or child and that no horse, mare, ox, cow, sheep or fowl be taken by officers or soldiers except for money.

(7) That any disorder or violence done by soldiers be redressed by the officers; if thev do not punish offenders (after complaint and proof) the officers shall be responsible for the wrong.

(8) That a list be set down of the monev allowed for quarterings of horse, foot and dragoons.

(9) When any difference arises between the collectors of a regiment and any person or heritor in the shire, the issue shall be decided bv the shire committee of war.

ABOVE Colonel's colour (?), Lord Balfour of Burleigh's Regiment (Dunbar no.126). Black field, white saltire; the Maiden standing on a green base has bare feet and arms, gold hair, skirt and belt. Underneath is a gold scroll with red edging and lettering. Some 13 tattered black colours with white saltires overall, but no company distinguishing marks, were also taken at Dunbar; they presumably belonged to this regiment.

ABOVE Colonel's colour (?), Lord Balfour of Burleigh's Regiment (Dunbar no.126). Black field, white saltire; the Maiden standing on a green base has bare feet and arms, gold hair, skirt and belt. Underneath is a gold scroll with red edging and lettering. Some 13 tattered black colours with white saltires overall, but no company distinguishing marks, were also taken at Dunbar; they presumably belonged to this regiment.

BELOW Colonel's colour, Lord Balmerino's Regiment (Dunbar no.41). White field, gold crest on silver and red orle; red edge to scroll. The regiment was probably incomplete when destroyed at Dunbar, and none of the company colours can be identified.

(10)That no officers or soldiers hinder the gathering of the maintenance of previous months on any pretext.

The realitv. of course, was that the army was a barely tolerated nuisance even when it was protecting the local community. When Colonel George Forbes of Millbuie levied 20 recruits from Banff in the summer of 1646. he had to sign a bond promising to repay to the burgh the cost of arming and clothing them. This was bad enough; but when the regiment was disbanded only a couple of weeks later, the government took considerable persuading to take on the debt. It was hardly surprising therefore that all too often officers and men simply took what they needed without troubling themselves as to legal niceties.

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