Where to Learn More

Davis, William C., Brian C. Pohanka, and Don Troiani. Civil War Journal: The Leaders. Nashville, TN: Rutledge Hill Press, 1997.

Green, Carl R., and William R. Sanford. Union Generals of the Civil War. Springfield, NJ: Enslow, 1998.

McClellan, George B. McClellan's Own Story. New York: C. L. Webster, 1887. Reprint, Scituate, MA: Digital Scanning, 1999.

McClellan Society. MG George B. McClellan Pages. [Online] http://www. civilwarreader.com/mcclellan/ (accessed on October 15, 1999).

Rowland, Thomas J. George B. McClellan and Civil War History: In the Shadow of Grant and Sherman. Kent, OH: Kent State University Press, 1998.

Sears, Stephen W. George B. McClellan: The Young Napoleon. New York: Ticknor and Fields, 1988. Reprint, New York: Da Capo Press, 1999.

Waugh, John C. The Class of 1846: From West Point to Appomattox: Stonewall Jackson, George McClellan, and Their Brothers. New York: Warner Books, 1994.

George G. Meade

Born December 31, 1815 Cádiz, Spain Died November 6, 1872 Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Union general Led Northern forces to victory at the Battle of Gettysburg

George G. Meade

Born December 31, 1815 Cádiz, Spain Died November 6, 1872 Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Union general Led Northern forces to victory at the Battle of Gettysburg

General George G. Meade will always be best remembered for his involvement in the famous Battle of Gettysburg. During this mid-1863 battle in the Pennsylvania countryside, Meade guided the Union's Army of the Potomac to a smashing victory over the South's Army of Northern Virginia, commanded by General Robert E. Lee (1807-1870; see entry). This Union victory is often cited as a major reason why the North eventually was able to win the war.

But despite his role in this important Northern triumph, Meade has received less praise for his performance than a number of other Civil War generals. His cautious pursuit of Lee's battered army after Gettysburg has been criticized by many historians. In addition, the decision of General Ulysses S. Grant (1822-1885; see entry) to take personal command of the Army of the Potomac in 1864 put Meade in Grant's shadow for the remainder of the war. Nonetheless, Meade's triumph at Gettysburg has assured him a prominent place in Civil War history.

"The results of [Meade's] victory [were] priceless. . . . The charm of Robert Lee's invincibility [was] broken.

Writer George Templeton Strong

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