Where to Learn More

Burchard, Peter. We'll Stand by the Union: Robert Gould Shaw and the Black 54th Massachusetts Regiment. New York: Facts on File, 1993.

Duncan, Russell, ed. Blue-Eyed Child of Fortune: The Civil War Letters of Colonel Robert Gould Shaw. Athens: University of Georgia Press, 1992.

Duncan, Russell. Where Death and Glory Meet: Colonel Robert Gould Shaw and the 54th Massachusetts Infantry. Athens: University of Georgia Press, 1999.

National Gallery of Art. Augustus Saint-Gaudens' Memorial to Robert Gould Shaw and the Massachusetts Fifty-fourth Regiment. [Online] http:// www.nga.gov/feature/shaw/home.htm (accessed on October 16, 1999).

Smith, Marion W. Beacon's Hill Colonel Robert Gould Shaw. New York: Carlton Press, 1986.

Smith, Marion W. Colonel Robert Gould Shaw: A Pictorial Companion. New York: Carlton Press, 1990.

Trudeau, Noah Andre. Like Men of War: Black Troops in the Civil War. Boston: Little, Brown, 1998.

Philip H. Sheridan

Born March 6, 1831 Albany, New York Died August 5, 1888 Nosquitt, Massachusetts

Union cavalry general Led successful Shenandoah Campaign in 1864 and won Battle of Five Forks in April 1865, which ultimately resulted in General Lee's surrender at Appomattox

Philip H. Sheridan

Born March 6, 1831 Albany, New York Died August 5, 1888 Nosquitt, Massachusetts

Philip Sheridan was one of the Union Army's finest military leaders during the second half of the Civil War. His steady direction was vital in improving the performance of the Army of the Potomac's cavalry corps in 1863. A year later, his successful invasion of Virginia's Shenandoah Valley pushed the Confederacy one step closer to surrender. Finally, his victory at Five Forks in April 1865 forced General Robert E. Lee (1807-1870; see entry) to abandon his defense of Richmond (the capital city of the Confederacy) and helped bring the war to a close. In recognition of these accomplishments, Union commander Ulysses S. Grant (1822-1885; see entry) stated, "I believe General Sheridan has no superior as a general, either living or dead, and perhaps not an equal."

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