Where to Learn More

Davis, William C., Brian C. Pohanka, and Don Troiani. Civil War Journal: The Leaders. Nashville, TN: Rutledge Hill, 1997.

The Forrest Preserve. [Online] http://nbforrest.com/ (accessed on October 9, 1999).

General Nathan Bedford Forrest Historical Society. [Online] http://www.ten-nessee-scv.org/ForrestHistSociety/ (accessed on October 9, 1999).

Hurst, Jack. Nathan Bedford Forrest: A Biography. New York: Knopf, 1993.

Jordan, Thomas, and J. P. Pryor. The Campaigns of Lieut.-Gen. N. B. Forrest and of Forrest's Cavalry. New Orleans: Blelock, 1868. Reprint, New York: Da Capo Press, 1996.

Lytle, Andrew Nelson. Bedford Forrest and His Critter Company. New York: Minton, Balch and Co., 1931. Reprint, Nashville: J. S. Sanders and Co., 1992.

Wills, Brian S. A Battle from the Start: The Life of Nathan Bedford Forrest. New York: HarperCollins, 1992. Reprint, Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, 1998.

Wills, Brian S. The Confederacy's Greatest Cavalryman: Nathan Bedford Forrest. Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, 1998.

Wyeth, John A. Life of General Nathan Bedford Forrest. New York: Harper, 1899. Reprint, Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1989.

John C. Fremont

Born January 21, 1813 Savannah, Georgia Died July 13, 1890 New York, New York

American West explorer known as the "Pathfinder"

Removed from his command as a Union general for issuing his own "emancipation proclamation"

in Missouri

John C. Fremont

Born January 21, 1813 Savannah, Georgia Died July 13, 1890 New York, New York

I ohn C. Fremont was one of the best-known explorers of the I American West in the first half of the nineteenth century. "His scientific and surveying work was crucial in opening America beyond the Mississippi, and his heroic image and legend helped imbue [fill] the West with the romance with which it is still colored," according to Edward D. Harris in John Charles Fremont and the Great Western Reconnaissance. "He remains a symbol of a younger, untamed, and adventurous America."

In 1856, Fremont became the antislavery Republican political party's first presidential candidate. When the Civil War began a few years later, he took command of Union forces in Missouri—one of the four "border states" that allowed slavery but remained part of the United States. Instead of using diplomacy to gain the support of those residents who had wanted to join the Confederacy, Fremont used harsh, controversial measures to maintain order. In fact, Fremont declared that he would take away property and free slaves belonging to anyone who supported the Southern cause. He took this step a full year before President Abraham

John Fremont "remains a symbol of a younger, untamed, and adventurous America."

Writer Edward D. Harris

John C. Fremont. (Courtesy of the Library of Congress.)

Lincoln (1809-1865; see entry) issued his Emancipation Proclamation freeing the slaves in the South. Because Fremont had exceeded his authority, the president removed him from command a short time later.

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