Where to Learn More

Fehrenbacher, Don E. The Dred Scott Case: Its Significance in American Law and Politics. New York: Oxford University Press, 1978.

Finkelman, Paul. Dred Scott v. Sandford: A Brief History with Documents. Boston: Bedford Books, 1997.

Fleischner, Jennifer. The Dred Scott Case: Testing the Right to Live Free. Brookfield, CT: Milbrook Press, 1997.

Herda, D. J. The Dred Scott Case: Slavery and Citizenship. Hillside, NJ: En-slow, 1994.

Lukes, Bonnie L. The Dred Scott Decision. San Diego: Lucent Books, 1997.

Winfield Scott

Born June 13, 1786 Petersburg, Virginia Died May 27, 1866 West Point, New York

Union general in chief at the beginning of the Civil War

Developed the "Anaconda Plan," which eventually helped the Union win the war

Winfield Scott

Born June 13, 1786 Petersburg, Virginia Died May 27, 1866 West Point, New York

A veteran of the War of 1812 (1812-15), the Seminole Wars (1835-42), and the Mexican War (1846-48), General Winfield Scott had achieved the position of commander over all Federal forces when the Civil War began in 1861. His advanced age and poor health made it impossible for him to lead troops into combat personally, and he was forced to resign his position a few months after the war started. Before resigning, though, he developed a war strategy for the Union that helped it gain victory in the conflict. Scott's strategy helped cement his reputation as one of America's most successful military figures of the nineteenth century.

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