Color Plate Commentary

Renault Armored Car

Machine-gun wagon of United Russia, Southern Front. Note Volunteer Army chevron on side (red-blue-white) from bottom to top and the Russian tricolor flag to the right. On the top of the wagon are two machine-gun turrets and commander's turret. Note machine-gun shields and older cyrillic letters in white. (Kolomiets)

A1: DON COSSACK ARMORED CAR MEDVEDITSA, SUMMER 1919

This car was named in honor of the village of Ust-Medved-itskaia, which rose against the Reds in spring 1919. This Austin first series was rebuilt on a truck chassis, hence the solid double tire configuration on the rear axles. Solid rubber bulletproof Russian Gusmatik tires were installed on the front axles and the front mudguards were removed. Russian modifications included machine-gun shields, the driver's door and the folding plate in the front of the driver. The yellow circle, black triangle and border represent the Don Army, while the tricolor roundel indicates subordination to the Armed Forces of South Russia (AFSR). The flag of the Don Cossacks, scarlet, yellow and blue, is attached to the front.

A2: VOLUNTEER ARMY ARMORED CAR MIGHTY, 1919

The Austin third series normally sported double rear wheels; however, the White Army tended to remove these as spares. The name in the inset above is Brave. These armored cars arrived from Britain new. in dark green, at the port of Novqrossisk in April 1919. Along with their sister car Vigilant, they formed the 2nd Armored Car Detachment assigned to the Caucasian Army. AFSR. The roundel and chevron appeared in the Russian national colors of red. blue and white. The Whites often used flags on their armored cars in order to better identify themselves from their various opponents.

B1: RENAULT FT-17 TANK, 1920

This Reno is one of two belonging to the Detached Platoon, 1st Tank Divizion, Crimea, summer 1920. The two tanks were named Modest and Gray but the color of the names and exact positions are not known. This light tank bears the tricolor roundels of Baron Wrangel's Russian Army, and

Machine-gun wagon of United Russia, Southern Front. Note Volunteer Army chevron on side (red-blue-white) from bottom to top and the Russian tricolor flag to the right. On the top of the wagon are two machine-gun turrets and commander's turret. Note machine-gun shields and older cyrillic letters in white. (Kolomiets)

remains in the original French beige, green and brown camouflage. These tanks were initially part of the French armored force at Odessa, spring 1919, and had been assigned to the 303rd Company, 1st Battalion. 501st Special Artillery Regiment (some confusion about the actual unit subordination has occurred in previous historical records).

B2: MEDIUM MARK A WHIPPET TANK SPHINX, 1920

Tank No. A371 Sphinx is shown here just prior to capture by Red forces at the Kakhovka bridgehead, 5 September 1920. As part of the 2nd Tank Detachment, 1st Tank Divizion, Sphinx cleared the barbed wire entanglements before being knocked out by Red artillery. Note the British Tank Corps identification stripes and Russian tricolor roundel. All Whippets sent to Russia had their serial numbers, beginning with the white alpha character A, followed by three digits, starting either with 2 or 3, painted on their cabs.

C1: MARK V TANK NO. 9261 FIRST AID, NORTHWEST RUSSIA, 1919

Six Mark V composite tanks of the Northwest Russian Tank Detachment assembled in Estonia in August 1919 to support General N.N. Yudenich's White Northwestern Army. After inspecting the tanks, Yudenich christened No. 9261 First Aid. British Captain L.H. Battersby initially commanded First Aid until being succeeded for the final actions by a Russian naval officer, Commander Bystrumov. In this plate the tank bears

Color Plate British Awi Artilleryman
Artillery wagon of United Russia, Southern Front. Note Volunteer Army chevrons on the side and newer cyrillic letters at right in white.

the red. blue and white tricolor vertically according to procedures established by the Northwestern Army. All Mark Vs sent to Russia had four white numbers starting with "9" on the side and to the rear of the sponson.

C2: MEDIUM MARK B TANK, NO. 1613, NORTH RUSSIA, 1919

The North Russian Tank Detachment arrived in the White Sea port of Archangel in August 1919. Two Medium Mark B tanks landed, including No. 1613. Medium Bs sent to Russia had four white numerals on the side, slightly to the rear of center. The British left two tanks behind for the local White forces when they evacuated in October 1919, a Mark V and No. 1613. General Miller's Whites sank the tanks in the North Dvina River in February 1920 in order to avoid their capture; nevertheless, the Reds recovered No. 1613 and sent it to Moscow. No. 1613 entered the Red Army painted in camouflage and with hammer and plough symbols superimposed on a red star on the cab.

D: MARK V COMPOSITE TANK NO. 9358, FOR HOLY RUSSIA, KAKHOVKA, AUTUMN 1920

For Holy Russia served in the 3rd Tank Detachment. 1 st Tank

Divizion, in General Baron Wrangel's Russian Army in 1920. This tank was a composite Mark V. which consisted of one "male" sponson (6-pdr gun and one machine gun), one female sponson (two machine guns), and one machine gun in the front and one in the rear. All Mark V tanks sent to Russia seem to have been composites except for two "females" that only housed machine guns.

Mark V tanks essentially followed the internal layout of the earlier Mark IV. However, the new design included several alterations: better observation points, additional ventilation, a new and more powerful engine, an additional rear hatch and door, improved track cleaning, more convenient storage, superior maneuvering capabilities and new one-driver control.

The tank's interior featured walls painted in gloss white and a floor painted in light gray. Many sub-components retained their original metallic finishes. Externally, the tank remained in the British dark olive green. The Whites painted the Russian national tricolor horizontally over the original

Don Cossack armored train Azovets, attached to the 1st Armored Railway Regiment, Don Armored Train Brigade, southern front. The Azovets participated in fierce fighting around Voronezh in September 1919. During the retreat, the Cossacks drove the train into the River Don to prevent capture. (Kolomiets)

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