Armored Locomotive

American Armored Train
White armored train, Rostov-on-Don, 1919. Sources indicate this train may be either the General Drozdovsky, or a Don Cossack train. The lettering, apparently in black along the side of the first wagon, is indecipherable. (Kolomiets)

British identification colors of white and red. The Whites painted the tank's name in white on the front sloping plate below the front cab and retained the tank's number in white on the side and to the rear of the sponson (see insets).

For Holy Russia penetrated deep into the Red defenses at Kakhovka in October 1920 before being struck in the left side by artillery. Red captors cannibalized parts from other Mark Vs taken in action in order to repair the tank and subsequently renamed it the Muscovite Proletarian.

E1: CZECH ARMORED MOTOR WAGON ZAAMUREC, SIBERIA 1919-20

The Czech Legion captured Red armored train No. 4, Polupanov, in Simbirsk on 22 July 1918. This train consisted of the Zaamurec motor wagon, two artillery wagons, an armored locomotive and a tender. The Czechs renamed this armored train Orlik or "Young Eagle." Zaamurec had been designed in 1916 on a Fax-Arbel flatbed, with walls of 16mm (0.63in.) armor (12mm/0.47in. on sloped sections) and two Italian 60-hp petrol engines. Each turret could rotate 360 degrees and the guns could fire 10 degrees downward and 60 degrees upward. Fire control turrets were added in

1917. Zaamurec carried eight machine guns, eight periscopes, an intercom system, signaling equipment, two searchlights and two artillery range finders. The original 57mm Nordenfeld guns were changed to 76.2mm weapons in

1918. The name Orlik appeared in white, machine-metaled letters that were bolted onto the right side of the front turret; thus, in this depiction, the letters would appear on the opposite side. The letters vuz cis. 1. mean "wagon number 1." Zaamurec could operate as part of the Orlik configuration, or independently.

E2: CZECH ARMORED TRAIN ORLIK, CENTRAL SIBERIA, 1919-20

This plate depicts the usual components of Orlik, exclusive of the Zaamurec motor wagon. The first Czech national flag of white and red appears in the inset. Orlik had a "ChN" type armored locomotive with 12mm (0.47in.) steel plating, that burned either coal or wood. The Orlik echelon or configuration included two double-axle artillery wagons with similar profiles, each mounting 12 machine guns. The first, with a conical gun turret, carried a 76.2mm Model 1902 piece, while the second, with a cylindrical turret, sported a mountain gun, 76.2mm Model 1904. The turrets could traverse 270 degrees. The crew of 100 included four officers. The train roamed the length of the Trans-Siberian, clearing away Red and Green partisans until the Czech evacuation from Vladivostok in May 1920. Thereafter, Orlik served the remnants of the White Army operating in the Russian Far East. After Vladivostok fell to the Reds in 1922. the Whites moved the train to Manchuria where it served a local Chinese warlord for six years before vanishing from history.

F1: VOLUNTEER ARMY ARMORED TRAIN FORWARD FOR FATHERLAND, SUMMER 1918

Established on 14 July 1918 at Tikhoretskaia, after being captured from the Reds, the train's composition included an armored "Ov" type locomotive and armored tender, a half-armored wagon with a 75mm piece, a machine-gun wagon with eight machine guns (not shown here) and an armored wagon with a 3-in. gun. The name appeared in white on the side of the engine. The double-headed eagle emblem of the Romanovs can be seen in white on the side of the 3-in. gun wagon. This train participated in the second Kuban campaign, the clearing of the northern Caucasus and subsequently served in the Caucasian Army, AFSR.

F2: VOLUNTEER ARMY, ARMORED TRAIN OFFICER, FEBRUARY 1919

The Whites captured Officer in August 1918. The crew numbered 48 officers and 67 enlisted men. Abandoned at Novorossisk in March 1920, the train configuration and crew re-emerged in the Crimea as the Glory of Kuban in April.

Officer comprised two identical double-axle armored gun wagons that housed 76.2mm Model 1902 field pieces with a 360-degree traverse, an armored "Ch" type locomotive, and a tender that contained the commander's compartment and two machine guns. The casement of the armored gun wagons sported 12 Maxim machine guns, five per side and

Russian Train 1919

Don Cossack train, south Russia, 1919. The white letters along the side read "Train of Don Propaganda Section... " before becoming indecipherable. The emblem left of center is on all train wagons. The field of the emblem alternates black and orange, colors of the Order of St. George, given for heroism. Superimposed on the field at the top is a silver sword piercing a silver crown of thorns, an heroic symbol of sacrifice adopted by the Volunteer Army and Don Cossacks who had participated in the "Ice March" in the Kuban during 1918. The chevron from bottom to top is red, blue and white. (Deryabin)

Don Cossack train, south Russia, 1919. The white letters along the side read "Train of Don Propaganda Section... " before becoming indecipherable. The emblem left of center is on all train wagons. The field of the emblem alternates black and orange, colors of the Order of St. George, given for heroism. Superimposed on the field at the top is a silver sword piercing a silver crown of thorns, an heroic symbol of sacrifice adopted by the Volunteer Army and Don Cossacks who had participated in the "Ice March" in the Kuban during 1918. The chevron from bottom to top is red, blue and white. (Deryabin)

an additional pair capable of firing forward from the front of each wagon.

The enlarged portion of this plate reveals machine-gun ports, the double-headed Imperial eagle in white, and the tricolor roundel. The Volunteer Army painted Officer in white lettering on both sides of each gun wagon as well as at the front of each turret.

G1: VOLUNTEER ARMY ARMORED TRAIN TO MOSCOW, WINTER 1919-SPRING 1920

Established 13 September 1919 at the Sudostal Works, Novorossisk, the heavy armored train To Moscow defended the Rostov-Novorossisk sector until being captured by the

Reds in March 1920. The echelon consisted of two almost identical gun wagons (each with two machine guns in sponsons on the side), at least one machine-gun wagon and an engine and tender. The gun wagons had the black lettering (with red shading behind the black) To Moscow superimposed on the side and front over Volunteer Army chevrons. The black double-headed eagle symbolizes Russia's claim to be the Third Rome after the fall of the Byzantine Empire and is seen here without the crown, orb and scepter of the Romanov Dynasty. The flag bears the Russian tricolor in the upper corner and also the symbol of the armored train service, that of crossed cannon barrels and a winged wheel on rails. Black numbers 9 49922 and 9 48878 appeared to the front of the gun wagons. According to Russian sources, the guns were 107mm or 122mm weapons; however, the gun on this wagon appears to be a remounted British 60-pdr. The train itself appears in heavily weathered khaki.

G2: WHITE SIBERIAN ARMORED TRAIN VITYAZ, FALL 1920

Established in spring 1920, Vityaz or "Knight" had a complement of 100 officers and 35 enlisted men, commanded by Colonel F.F. Meibom. All were select volunteers from the late General V.O. Kappel's Volga Brigade. Vityaz fought in eastern Siberia and in one encounter destroyed the Red armored train Comrade Blyukher.

This train consisted of an armored locomotive and tender, two armored wagons, two semi-armored wagon platforms with guns and two wagon platforms carrying engineering material. The six guns included one naval Canet. a 4.5-in. howitzer, one 47mm Hotchkiss on the tower next to the commander and three 3-in. Japanese field pieces. Ten Maxim and eight Colt machine guns bristled along the casements of the armored wagons. The armored train's name in white was superimposed above the white lettering "For Rus. Sacred, United and Indivisible." Above the commander's position flew the Russian national flag.

Kuban Cossack armored train No. 4, constructed by the Kuban Railway Sotnia. The letters, crossed axe, and anchor are white. Note the well-armored locomotive. (Kolomiets)

Kuban Cossack armored train No. 4, constructed by the Kuban Railway Sotnia. The letters, crossed axe, and anchor are white. Note the well-armored locomotive. (Kolomiets)

Armored Locomotive

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